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A Veteran Commits Suicide Every 80 Minutes


“Center For A New American Security Study Reveals Startling Statistic.”

 

by Ken Smith 

 

A veteran commits suicide every 80 minutes, according to a study published Monday.

Military suicides have increased since the start of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, according to a Center for a New American Security Suicide report. In the fiscal year 2009 alone, 1,868 veterans of these wars have made suicide attempts, according to armytimes.com.

The VA estimates that about 18 veterans commit suicide every day, but this statistic is based on limited data. Only 16 states submit the cause of death among veterans and the VA relies on 3-year-old data for its reports. Improved information collection could help determine if veterans are committing suicide soon after leaving the military and if there’s a higher risk among post-9/11 veterans compared with earlier generations, the study noted.

“The DOD does not currently take sufficient responsibility for veteran suicide,” the authors said. “Given the potential implications of veteran suicide for the all volunteer force, the DOD should seek to understand which veterans, and how many veterans, are dying by suicide.”

These staggering figures underscore the need for the VA to develop more mental-health programs and an accurate system for recording the number of veterans and service members who take their lives.

“America is losing its battle against suicide by veterans and service members,” authors Dr. Margaret C. Harrell and Nancy Berglass concluded. “And as more troops return from deployment, the risk will only grow.”

Faced with the stigma of post-traumatic stress disorder, unemployment rates tipping 12 percent and a loss of the military camaraderie, many veterans report feeling purposeless upon returning home.

Marine Corps veteran Jason Christiansen, 35, of St. Paul, Minn. is one such veteran that nearly killed himself after watching his life unravel upon completing his service. He lost his job as an auto dealer in 2008, avoided debt collectors and fell into a serious depression, Minnesota.publicradio.org reports.

“At one point, I was sitting there with a gun in my mouth,” Christiansen told the news outlet.

A friend pushed Christiansen to seek help at a VA program, a key player in the rescuing of veterans in despair.

The Veterans Crisis Line, launched in 2007, has fielded more than 400,000 calls and has saved more than 14,000 lives, according to the Veterans Affairs mental health website.

The epidemic is raging among those who are currently serving too. From 2005 to 2010, approximately one service member committed suicide every 36 hours, the CNAS study revealed.

While the VA mental-health programs have proven to be effective, the authors of the report offered concrete suggestions on how to prevent even more military members and veterans from taking their lives.

 

 

 

 

Ken Smith

For more than twenty-five years Ken Smith has been a leading advocate for veterans. A combat Vietnam veteran, Ken served during 1971-72 as a paramedic and an infantry squad leader with Delta Company, 2nd Battalion, 1st Infantry, in the 196th Light Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. After his discharge, Ken continued his work as a paramedic in New England. On the streets of Boston he encountered growing numbers of homeless Vietnam veterans, and he became determined to both assist them and draw attention to their plight.

In 1989, Ken founded the New England Shelter for Homeless Veterans, located in a former VA hospital at 17 Court Street in downtown Boston. One of the first facilities designed for homeless veterans and now a national model, the shelter has served over 35,000 of America’s veterans who, for whatever reason, find themselves living on the streets.

In 1992 Ken was awarded Point of Light #142 by President George H. W. Bush, and later that same year received the AMVETS Silver Helmet Award, considered the “Oscar” for American veterans. As one of America’s foremost veterans service organizations, AMVETS (or American Veterans) has a proud history of assisting veterans and sponsoring numerous programs that serve our country and its citizens. Ken was awarded this honor along with Peter Coors, with whom he still maintains a personal friendship.

Over the years Ken has appeared on many national media programs including Good Morning America, Prime Time Live, ABC News, CBS News, Larry King Live, CNN, 60 Minutes, and The Geraldo Show. He has been quoted in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Boston Globe, The Los Angeles Times, The Chicago Tribune, The Miami Herald, and numerous international newspapers, magazines, and websites. In 1992, Ken had the distinction of addressing both the Republican and Democratic National Conventions as a keynote speaker on the subject of veterans.

Ken recently left his last assignment with the Military Order of the Purple Heart Service Foundation, where he was the chief technology architect of the Veteran’s Vocational Technical Institute, Purple Heart Car Donation program, Purple Heart Call Center, Purple Heart Radio, Purple Heart Tech Support, Purple Heart Services, and over thirty new Purple Heart websites. Ken Smith provided the vision and has overseen the implementation of innovative, virtual, work-at-home training programs for veterans with combat disabilities. Ken has designed, upgraded, and supervised the integration and installation of Purple Heart Service Foundations computer and telephony systems, upgrading features from legacy POTS phones to SIP-trunked communications systems including establishing new VPN networks for teams of remote virtual employees.

An adventure sports enthusiast, Ken enjoys extreme skiing, competitive sailing, flying, and travel. He has traveled extensively worldwide, delivering his positive message to the veterans of other countries that a paraplegic veteran of the United States suffers the same as a paraplegic veteran of India; that an amputee veteran of Nepal suffers as much as an amputee veteran of France. Ken’s mentor was Harold Russell, the two-time Academy Award winner who starred in the 1946 film Best Years of Our Lives. A World War II veteran, on D-Day, June 6th, 1944, Harold lost both of his hands. This ghastly misfortune did not stop him, and he went on to become the chairman of the President’s Committee for People with Disabilities. For over fifty years he served US presidents from Truman to Clinton. Ken was humbled and grateful when Harold agreed to serve as the best man at Ken’s wedding.
Ken has been instrumental in the planning stages for the Veterans Workshop, a new nationwide veterans’ advocacy group building a new “Veterans Hotline, and the development of special programs for those who have lost their sight or their hearing, or who have suffered spinal cord injury, as a result of their military experience. The Veterans Workshop provides a forum where new technology and advancements in the fields of prosthetic and orthotic solutions, many designed by Ken, are shared along with virtual training and employment programs.

A 1970 graduate of De La Salle Academy in Newport, Rhode Island, for the past twenty-five years Ken has continued his education with extensive college courses in computer technology and related social service fields. He resides in his native state of Rhode Island with his wife and children.

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Posted by on 11:47 pm, With 0 Reads, Filed under Medical Disability Benefits, PTSD, Veterans, Veterans Affairs. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

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4 Responses to "A Veteran Commits Suicide Every 80 Minutes"

  1. Michelle Cook  November 4, 2011 at 12:35 pm

    Cpl. Lovenguth USMC, if you don’t want to read the posts from this gent, then don’t. See who its from, and move along. Telling someone to OD or shoot himself in the head and just STFU so you aren’t bothered, well, that says how sick you still are. Your lack of empathy and even understanding is appalling. How would you feel if you were trying to get your voice heard and were told to STFU and kill yourself?

    Why you’re posting this on a page dealing with veteran suicide is beyond me. I hope someone gets you into the VA hospital quickly, so you can deal with this rage and anger to others. You officially qualify as the most horrible person I’ve read in months–and I hope you get treatment soon. For now, just know that you are the biggest douchebag out there.

    Michelle Cook
    CPL/E-4(P) USA

  2. Robert Lee Mason  November 4, 2011 at 8:54 am

    Problems star with the military and it’s careless handling of records usually, the the real demon comes out if you ever file a claim for PTSd. The name of the demon the VA. More veterans I suspect have committed suicide after filing a claim and being jerked around by the VA. i finally won my claim after 27 years of fighting and was awarded 100% S/c for PTSD from Nam. Now the Va has stated they will be issuing me a fee basis card as they admit they can’t treat me after what they did.
    I don’t whine and have all the prof in black and white.
    The VA and it’s lack of proper care is the main problem, not the veteran.

  3. HFactor  November 4, 2011 at 7:43 am

    Cpl lovenguth….
    The ANSWER and SOLUTIONS to this problem is to have EVERY soldier suffering or cares WHINE LOUD and WHINE PROUD until the American MASSES …..WAKE UP to this brutal reality and 1)Get involved 2)Force our corrupt government into REAL ACTION and/or 3)Anything I’m NOT saying that will WORK!!!!!….YOU being a ‘B. O’Reilly/Rush Limbaugh’ WANNABE…. ATTACK the messenger to stop the message is BS and shows YOUR WEAKNESS!
    KickAss Peace HH

  4. NightFlyer  November 3, 2011 at 9:13 am

    Peter, I’ve been reading VT for about two years now. We all have our VN demons but I gotta tell you, you’re a whiner man, When I was behind steel doors at the VA I got real tired of your type, always whining. If it’s that bad then you know the routine, shoot yourself in the head or eat a handful of oxy. But this constant “oh me” is really bullshit. People are seeking information and answers, and you just whine.

    Cpl. Lovenguth USMC (H) Door Gunner

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