.
Advertisement

Do Special Veterans Courts Really Work?


by Kristen Griffin|Mesothelioma.com News

 

(Washington, DC) – Special veterans courts are popping up in virtually every corner of the country. Starting in Buffalo, NY in 2008, the mission behind establishing veterans courts was to address the hard issues behind the sharp spike of crime among new veterans: drug and alcohol abuse.

Often called “Veterans’ Treatment Court,” not only help veterans address and overcome substance abuse problems, but any underlying psychological issue stemming from their time in the service that may in fact exacerbate their substance abuse.

Many of the psychological issues common among former active duty service members such as Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) or traumatic brain injury are woefully under reported. As such, many veterans with undiagnosed psychological issues never receive medical treatment.

Veterans courts differ in protocol depending on the jurisdiction. However, many of the basic premises are universal. Veterans may choose to have their criminal cases heard in a veterans court. In order to receive treatment, veterans accused of a crime must plead guilty.

As it is the case in with Tulsa’s Veterans Treatment Court Program, there are incentives in place that encourage veterans to seek treatment. Often, veterans courts provide mandatory counseling, education programs and job training.

Similar to “regular” court, if a veteran does not fulfill the obligations set forth in their plea deal, they find themselves back at square one, often in jail. However, on average, these specialized veterans courts have an extremely high success rates, where some of the best programs have nearly a 90% completion rate.

Perhaps the harder question to ask is why is there a need for special veterans courts in the first place? What is our system missing that so many of our Iraq and Afghanistan veterans are turning to drugs, alcohol, violence and crime?

Are the existing systems – the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and various veterans state agencies – simply unable to adapt to the changing needs of the returning veteran population and provide adequate services for veterans‘ health? Why do many not-for-profit veterans’ organizations have to pick up the slack of these government departments?

Regardless of the answers, it appears that these specialized veterans courts do, in fact, work. Though many of these programs are still in their infancy, the initial success does offer hope that perhaps the veterans court model could be used to help other populations suffering from addiction and psychological issues.

Veterans courts, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), Tulsa’s Veterans Treatment Court Program, veterans, Washington, DC.

Veterans Today

The Veterans Today Network is the group that manages VeteransToday.com

Latest posts by Veterans Today (see all)

Related Posts:

The views expressed herein are the views of the author exclusively and not necessarily the views of VT or any other VT authors, affiliates, advertisers, sponsors or partners and technicians. Notices

Posted by on 9:59 am, With 0 Reads, Filed under Benefits, Veterans. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

Comments Closed

One Response to "Do Special Veterans Courts Really Work?"

  1. Edwin Crosby III  September 1, 2012 at 2:16 pm

    I lived about 50 Miles from Buffalo when they created this court. AT NO TIME, did they ask me to participate in HOW this court should conduct itself. It became CLEAR this was a SHINE ON JOB as they would NOT tell a veteran about the SECRET CODE PLACED UPON THEIR DD FORM 214. The BAR ASSOCIATION wanted to make sure NO veteran, especially combat veterans would discover they had been stabbed in the back and their LIBERTY TAKEN AWAY. I would sure Love to Defend a veteran before this Court, AS EVERY VETERAN KNOWS, YOU CAN HAVE ANYONE SPEAK FOR YOU, YOU DO NOT HAVE TO HAVE A LAWYER DO THAT. REMEMBER WHAT YOU WERE TAUGHT IN THE MILITARY. These courts are a JOKE, they will not prevent Judges from standing trial for carrying out Genocide against veterans. Edwin H. Crosby III

You must be logged in to post a comment Login


TOP 50 READ ARTICLES THIS WEEK