Ann Coulter: I am through with Neocons’ endless wars in the Middle East

Ann Coulter: “We have been lied to over and over in cases like this and I do not think [Trump's attack on Syria] shows toughness...I've never understood why it is so much worse to die by a chemical than to have your head shot off, or to have your head chopped off. A half a million people have died already, this was 70 people, it makes no sense, whether or not he did it."

“Oh, boy. The Israelis are going to hate my new position.”

…by Jonas E. Alexis

 

Ladies and gentlemen, Ann Coulter is finally getting tired of perpetual wars in the Middle East. She has recently said she is “tired of regime change” and of “pointless” wars. She has even defied the Neocon ideology by saying quite frankly: “I don’t care if it was Assad who used these chemical weapons. I’m tired of regime change. I’m tired of war.”

In response to the so-called chemical attack, Coulter continued to say:

“But this, again, is not the first time we’ve had a Reichstag fire for some pointless war. In the Gulf War, famously we were told that Iraqi troops were rushing in and throwing — always the babies, it’s always the children — taking babies out of Kuwaiti hospitals and pulling them out of incubators and throwing them on the floor.

“[We were shown] congressional testimony from an alleged nurse who witnessed this, an eyewitness herself, and then people looked at her and said, wait a second that’s not a nurse that’s the Kuwaiti ambassador’s daughter, and it was, the whole thing was a hoax.

“We have been lied to over and over in cases like this and I do not think [Trump’s attack on Syria] shows toughness, I think it shows everything Trump’s enemies said about him — that he’s erratic, that he’s emotional, that he’s desperate for approval — it wasn’t because they violated some horrible, you know, laws of war and humanity.

“I’ve never understood why it is so much worse to die by a chemical than to have your head shot off, or to have your head chopped off. A half a million people have died already, this was 70 people, it makes no sense, whether or not he did it.”

Well, Coulter, it is about time. You have been shooting yourself in the toes for far too long. And if you are really tired of perpetual wars, perhaps you need to start apologizing to all the people who plunked down their own precious money to buy your books, in which you perpetuated the dumb idea that the Iraq war was a success.

In 2005, Coulter wrote that “Bush uttered the indisputably true fact that British intelligence believed Saddam Hussein had tried to acquire uranium from Africa.”[1] A colossal lie.[2] Paul R. Pillar, a 28-year old CIA veteran and a visiting professor at Georgetown University, declares in his book Intelligence and U.S. Foreign Policy that U.S. intelligence agencies have repeatedly told Bush that there was no evidence supporting the claim that Saddam was getting uranium from Africa.[3]

When the debacle in Iraq produced unwanted consequences such as sodomy at Abu Ghraib and inhumane torture,[4] Coulter again was on the move to defend the Neocon crowd. “I suffered more just listening to the endless repetition of those Abu Ghraib stories than the actual inmates ever did,” she sniffed indignantly.[5]

Back in 2013, Coulter again declared in Never Trust a Liberal Over 3-Especially a Republican that “The magnificently successful Iraq War has been rewritten as a failure” by the so-called Left.[6] In the same book, she again declared that America “won” the war, “executed a dictator, presided over democratic elections and killed loads of al Qaeda fighters.”[7]

No serious historian or scholar or even a journalist will take that silly position anymore. Jean Edward Smith, a biographer and the John Marshall Professor of Political Science at Marshall University, has recently put the final nail in the coffin of the Bush administration.

“Whether George W. Bush was the worst president in American history will be long debated,” Smith writes in his recent biography of Bush, “but his decision to invade Iraq is easily the worst foreign policy decision ever made by an American president.”[8]

Other military historians and scholars such as Andrew J. Bacevich say similar things. Bacevich, also retired career officer in the Armor Branch of the United States Army, writes:

“Apart from a handful of deluded neoconservatives, no one believes that the United States accomplished its objectives in Iraq, unless the main objective was to commit mayhem, apply a tourniquet to staunch the bleeding, and then declare the patient stable while hastily leaving the scene of the crime.

The fighting in Afghanistan and Iraq has exacted a huge price from the U.S. military—especially the army and the Marines. More than 6,700 soldiers have been killed so far in those two conflicts, and over fifty thousand have been wounded in action, about 22 percent with traumatic brain injuries.

“Furthermore, as always happens in war, many of the combatants are psychological casualties, as they return home with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or depression. The Department of Veterans Affairs reported in the fall of 2012 that more than 247,000 veterans of the Afghanistan and Iraq wars have been diagnosed with PTSD. Many of those soldiers have served multiple combat tours.

“It is hardly surprising that the suicide rate in the U.S. military increased by 80 percent from 2002 to 2009, while the civilian rate increased only 15 percent. And in 2009, veterans of Iraq were twice as likely to be unemployed as the typical American.

“On top of all that, returning war veterans are roughly four times more likely to face family-related problems like divorce, domestic violence and child abuse than those who stayed out of harm’s way.

“In 2011, the year the Iraq War ended, one out of every five active duty soldiers was on antidepressants, sedatives, or other prescription drugs. The incidence of spousal abuse spiked, as did the divorce rate among military couples. Debilitating combat stress reached epidemic proportions. So did brain injuries. Soldier suicides skyrocketed.”[9]

Coulter has obviously realized that the Neocon poison isn’t worth defending any longer. She seems to be saying now that perpetual wars kill; perpetual wars destroy; perpetual wars incite hatred; and perpetual wars have bludgeoned America to death in the Middle East. Coulter seems to have realized that if this diabolical trend continues, it will be the end of America as we know it. But that was not what Coulter was preaching in 2001. Back then, Coulter sent an ultimatum to much of the world saying:

“We should invade their countries [people in the Middle East], kill their leaders and convert them to Christianity. We weren’t punctilious about locating and punishing only Hitler and his top officers. We carpet-bombed German cities; we killed civilians. That’s war. And this is war.”[10]

Beautiful, isn’t it? Because she was morally and intellectually blind, Coulter could not see that her own assertion was a recipe for disaster. Now she is seeing the light of reason.

Coulter’s next move is to send a letter of apology to America, to young men and women who lost their precious lives in the Middle East for the Neocons and Israel, and to Iraqi men, women and children who are still paying the consequences of the war.

Finally, Coulter needs to start challenging the Israeli regime, which now wants to start World War III at any cost.


[1] Ann Coulter, How to Talk to Liberal (If You Must) (New York: Random House, 2005), 9.

[2] For studies on this, see John J. Mearsheimer, Why Leaders Lie: The Truth About Lying in International Politics (New York: Oxford University Press, 2011); Michael MacDonald, Overreach: Delusions of Regime Change in Iraq (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2014); John M. Schuessler, Deceit on the Road to War: Presidents, Politics, and American Democracy (New York: Cornell University Press, 2015); Muhammad Idrees Ahmad, The Road to Iraq: The Making of a (Neoconservative War (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2014); Paul R. Pillar, Intelligence and U.S. Foreign Policy: Iraq, 9/11, and Misguided Reform (New York: Columbia University Press, 2011); John J. Mearsheimer and Stephen M. Walt, The Israel Lobby and U.S. Foreign Policy (New York: Farrar & Straus, 2007).

[3] Paul R. Pillar, Intelligence and U.S. Foreign Policy: Iraq, 9/11, and Misguided Reform (New York: Columbia University Press, 2011).

[4] See for example Karen J. Greenberg, et al., The Torture Papers: The Road to Abu Ghraib (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005); Shadi Mokhtari, After Abu Ghraib: Exploring Human Rights in America and the Middle East(Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011); Jameel Jaffer and Amrit Singh, Administration of Torture: A Documentary Record from Washington to Abu Ghraib and Beyond (New York: Columbia University Press, 2007); Seymour M. Hersh, “The General’s Report,” The New Yorker, June 25, 2007;  Julian Borger, “U.S. General Linked to Abu Ghraib Abuse,” The Guardian, May 22, 2004; Luke Harding, “After Abu Ghraib,” The Guardian, September 20, 2004; Luke Harding, “Focus Shifts to Jail Abuse of Women,” Guardian, May 12, 2004; Philip Gourevitch and Errol Morris, “Exposure: The Women Behind the Camera at Abu Ghraib,” The New Yorker, March 24, 2008; Michael Otterman, American Torture: From the Cold War to Abu Ghraib and Beyond (Australia: Melbourne University Press, 2007), see chapters 9 and 10; Philippe Sands, Torture Team: Rumsfeld’s Memo and the Betrayal of American Values (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2008), 14-16; Jane Mayer, The Dark Side: The Inside Story of How the War on Terror Turned into a War on American Ideals (New York: Anchor Books, 2009); Maggie O’Kane, Teresa Smith, et al., “The Torture Trail: What Did General Petraeus’s Special Advisor, James Steele, Know?” The Guardian, October 23, 2010; David Leigh, “Iraq War Logs: Prisoner Beaten to Death Days after British Handover to Police,” The Guardian, October 28, 2010; David Leigh and Maggie O’Kane, “Iraq War Logs: U.S. Turned Over Captives to Iraqi Torture Squads,” The Guardian, October 24, 2010; Nick Davies, Jonathan Steele and David Leigh, “Iraq War Logs: Secret Files Show How U.S. Ignored Torture,” The Guardian, October 22, 2010; Mark Danner, Torture and Truth: America, Abu Ghraib, and the War on Terror (New York: New York Review of Books, 2004).

[5] Ann Coulter, If Democrats Had Any Brains, They’d Be Republicans (New York: Random House, 2007), 2.

[6] Ann Coulter, Never Trust a Liberal Over 3-Especially a Republican (Washington: Regnery Publishing, 2013), 3.

[7] Ibid., 16-17.

[8] Jean Edward Smith, Bush (New York: Simon & Schuster, 2016), 660.

[9] Andrew J. Bacevich, Breach of Trust: How Americans Failed Their Soldiers and Their Country (New York: Metropolitan Books, 2013), 94, 105.

[10] Ann Coulter, “This is war,” TownHall.com, September 14, 2001.

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