ISIS Spreading ‘Flesh-Eating’ Disease in Syria as a Biologic Weapon

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Leishmaniasis Wounds
 Photo right: Leishmaniasis Wounds
ISIS terrorist group are spreading ‘flesh eating bug’ across Syria as a result of killing people and dumping their corpses in streets, this is the leading factor behind the rapid spread of Leishmaniasis.

Experts say that Leishmaniasis disease is being spread across the country “as a result of abominable acts by ISIS that included the killing of innocent people and dumping their corpses in streets”.

Known as Leishmaniasis disease, there have been 500 reported cases in Syria over the last year, Mirror reports.

Dilqash Isa, who works for the Kurdish Red Crescent, said: “As a result of abominable acts by ISIS that included the killing of innocent people and dumping their corpses in streets, this is the leading factor behind the rapid spread of Leishmaniasis.

Also among those who have warned about health issues in Syria is The World Health Organisation (WHO).It claims that there are 13 million Syrians in need of humanitarian aid.

The effects of Leishmaniasis on a victim in Syria

A statement read: “Despite our best efforts, health needs are escalating, and more than four years of crisis is causing the Syrian health system to deteriorate.


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3 COMMENTS

  1. Cutaneous Leishmaniasis disease was virtually NON-EXISTENT in Syria before the current conflict.

    Although affecting +/-12 million in Afghanistan<, Algeria, Brazil, Colombia & Iran — NOT Syria.

    Congruent with the above easily-tested hypothesis, Afghan-based 'terrorists' might easily have brought cutaneous Leishmaniasis-spreading protozoan parasites to Syria to infect dead bodies — to be left in the streets as disease vectors for Leishmaniasis (thus increasing disease & refugee outflows).

    Cutaneous, not abdominal. But insidious and abominable. Depending on the strain, oral Miltefosine, Fluconazole or Itraconazole and topical Paromomycin (all from Big Pharma) can be effective against cutaneous Leishmaniasis. As suspected, relatively-cheap oral neem leaf tea and topical neem oil may be just as effective against cutaneous Leishmaniasis. In India, the neem tree is "The Pharmacy on a Tree."

  2. IMHO, spread of ‘Flesh-Eating’ or Leishmaniasis disease may be or is due to intentional parasitic contamination of dead bodies left in the streets by al-Qaeda-affiliated Muslim Brotherhood terrorists (e.g., ISIS and/or al-Nusra) — as suggested & facilitated by the terrorists’ Western & Mideast sponsors.

    Certain protozoan parasites cause the disease, and certain sandfly bites spread the disease. No other known natural or manmade disaster has resulted proportionate cases of Leishmaniasis disease in similar climatic environments — even with large numbers of unattended dead bodies in the streets.

    Syria, Iran, India, China or Russia may need to deploy an epidemiologist to test this hypothesis.

    • Cutaneous Leishmaniasis disease was virtually NON-EXISTENT in Syria before the current conflict.

      Although affecting +/-12 million in Afghanistan<, Algeria, Brazil, Colombia & Iran — NOT Syria.

      Congruent with the above easily-tested hypothesis, Afghan-based 'terrorists' might easily have brought cutaneous Leishmaniasis-spreading protozoan parasites to Syria to infect dead bodies — to be left in the streets as disease vectors for Leishmaniasis (thus increasing disease & refugee outflows).

      Cutaneous, not abdominal. But insidious and abominable. Depending on the strain, oral Miltefosine, Fluconazole or Itraconazole and topical Paromomycin (all from Big Pharma) can be effective against cutaneous Leishmaniasis. As suspected, relatively-cheap oral neem leaf tea and topical neem oil may be just as effective against cutaneous Leishmaniasis. In India, the neem tree is "The Pharmacy on a Tree."

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