Dead Taliban Leader, Killed in Drone Strike, Insists He is Alive

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In this photograph taken on November 3, 2015, Mullah Mohammad Rasool Akhund, the newly appointed leader of a breakaway faction of the Taliban, addresses a gathering of supporters at Bakwah in the western province of Farah. A breakaway faction of the Taliban has appointed its own leader in the first formal split in the Afghan militant movement under new head Mullah Mansour, posing a fresh hurdle to potential peace talks. Mullah Rasool was named the leader of the faction in a mass gathering of dissident fighters this week in the remote southwestern province of Farah, according to an AFP reporter who attended the meeting. AFP PHOTO / Javed Tanveer

In this photograph taken on November 3, 2015, Mullah Mohammad Rasool Akhund, the newly appointed leader of a breakaway faction of the Taliban, addresses a gathering of supporters at Bakwah in the western province of Farah. A breakaway faction of the Taliban has appointed its own leader in the first formal split in the Afghan militant movement under new head Mullah Mansour, posing a fresh hurdle to potential peace talks. Mullah Rasool was named the leader of the faction in a mass gathering of dissident fighters this week in the remote southwestern province of Farah, according to an AFP reporter who attended the meeting. AFP PHOTO / Javed Tanveer

The recent report that Mullah Akhtar Mohammad Mansoor, leader of the Afghan Freedom Fighters Taliban, was killed in a U.S. drone strike, is not true. Although the U.S. government and the U.S. installed Afghan administration have reported that he has been killed, reliable sources inside Afghanistan have stated that it was an innocent Balochi villager, named Wali Mohammad, who was killed by the drone strike and not the Afghan Freedom Fighters leader. This innocent villager had the misfortune of looking like the Taliban leader and being in the wrong place at the wrong time. Afghans, who are spies and interpreters for the United States, once again misinformed the United States government. These drone killings of civilians based on misinformation has happened everyday these past 15 years. Enough is enough.

It is not good for the United States to make such false statements in the media regarding the drone killing. Six months ago the U.S. government reported that it had killed the Taliban leader. Now again the same propaganda. It is embarrassing and not good for the United States’ reputation. Once again innocent civilians are being killed by these U.S. drone strikes, which are unlawful and violate international law. The war in Afghanistan needs to stop. The U.S. must stop its unlawful drone strikes. The killing of innocent people needs to stop. Perpetrators of these war crimes must be prosecuted in lawful tribunals. Enough lies.

Author Details
Abdul Kadir Mohmand was born in Kabul, Afghanistan. He currently resides at Kalamazoo, Michigan. He graduated from Kabul High School. On an UNESCO scholarship, Mr. Mohmand studied at Sofia University, Bulgaria from 1976 until 1978 when his studies were interrupted by the Communist seizure of power in Afghanistan. The new Afghan Communist government ordered the Bulgarian government to return him to Afghanistan because he was anti-communist. Mr. Mohmand requested political asylum. With the help of the United Nations and the U.S. Embassy, he arrived to Italy and then the United States in 1979. Mr. Mohmand returned to his studies and earned his B.S. in 1983 from Western Michigan University. He found employment in various positions in the engineering business. For many years, he worked for BFI and was country operations manager for BFI Italia. Currently, Mr. Mohmand owns a shopping center and develops commercial properties. During the 1980s, Mr. Mohmand was the Representative of the Afghan Mujahideen for North America. During the 1980s, Mr. Mohmand returned to Afghanistan to fight as a freedom fighter against the Soviets and Afghan communists. Through an arrangement with Borgess Hospital in Kalamazoo, Michigan, Mr. Mohmand would bring back wounded Afghan children and Mujahideen for medical treatment at Borgess and recuperation in his home in Kalamazoo. He formed and was president of a nonprofit, Aid for Afghanistan. In the 1980s, Mr. Mohmand also worked with the Committee for a Free Afghanistan in Washington D.C to bring wounded Afghans to the United States for medical treatment. For the past four decades Mr. Mohmand has dedicated his life to working to achieve true peace and stability in Afghanistan. A few years ago, Mr. Mohmand organized educated Afghans intellectuals across the world who drafted a comprehensive plan for peace. Presently, he has united many different Afghan peace organizations under one umbrella. The goal of this network is to unite Afghans to bring true peace in and the independence of Afghanistan. This network wants to be the bridge between the Afghan freedom fighters and the silent Afghan majority, and the Western World in any peace negotiations. Mr. Mohmand wants true peace and stability in Afghanistan. As a veteran of war, Mr. Mohmand hates war.
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