Princess Diana – Unlawful Killing

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Diana, Princess of Wales died 20 years ago today in Paris in what it would be a gross understatement to say were very suspicious circumstances.

Although I have studied the case, I am not confident in stating who I believe was behind this murder, other than to say the British intelligence services were the perpetrators, that they received the cooperation and assistance of the French and that should the truth ever come out, it would have seismic effects on the British nation.

Of course, I have my suspicions and I am very much against the existence of a royal family, a glaring anachronism in the modern age.

I will state that I firmly believe that Diana survived the car crash with injuries that would not have lead to her death, someone intervened between her leaving that mangled vehicle and reaching the hospital in order to cause her demise.

Why she was killed is not a simple question to answer, and there are multiple theories. I am not sure what I believe, but I will say this – I bet the senior members of the House of Windsor could answer the question of why Diana had to die.

Probably the best film on the subject was financed by Mohammed Al-Fayed, the colourful Egyptian tycoon and father of Dodi Al-Fayed who died in the wreckage of the Mercedes in the Alma tunnel and was widely believed to be Diana’s new partner.

You can view the full length film at the Youtube link at the top of this page. The film asks many of the right questions, awkward, inconvenient questions which lead to it being banned by UK magistrates.

The director, Keith Allen wrote this article for the Independent about how his film was banned in Britain:

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Near the beginning of Unlawful Killing, I show a clip of Princess Diana (who would have been 50 on Friday) speaking less than two years before her untimely death. Well aware that sections of the British establishment had begun to despise her (following her separation from Prince Charles) and wanted her to disappear from public life, she summarised her plight in two pithy phrases: “She won’t go quietly – that’s the problem.”


My film about the inquest into her death won’t go quietly either, despite the best efforts of sections of the British press to stifle it at birth. That’s not surprising, because journalists widely regarded the 2007-08 inquest as a complete waste of time and money, so it was inevitable that many of them would also dismiss my documentary, which was screened twice at the Cannes Film Festival in May.

Yet what those screenings revealed was a yawning chasm between the perceptions of the press (several of whom did not actually see the film before writing about it) and those of the audiences who did attend. Because while the former were overwhelmingly hostile, the latter were overwhelmingly favourable, and were persuaded by the evidence that I and my production team have assembled that there was something extremely fishy about what happened in the Alma tunnel in 1997 and in the Royal Courts of Justice a decade later.

For the record, both Cannes screenings were packed from start to finish, as was an earlier test screening in Los Angeles (conducted by Nielsen NRG), and audience comments taken afterwards were almost uniformly positive. In the weeks since Cannes, the film has sold to a dozen territories worldwide, with negotiations in a further 20 still in full swing.

The veteran US investigative author and lawyer Mark Lane (who first exposed the cover-up surrounding the assassination of JFK) has endorsed the central findings of my documentary. And on 6 July, it will receive its first full public screening as a highlight of the Galway Film Festival (with many more festivals also eager to show it).

So why did much of the British press report that bored audiences walked out during the screenings at Cannes, when that was demonstrably untrue (and was flatly contradicted by the enthusiastic vox pops which were recorded outside the cinema by Reuters TV)? Why did they pretend that I had tried to conceal the financial backing I had received from Mohamed al-Fayed (whose son Dodi also died in the Alma crash), when I had written lengthy articles in The Guardian and the Daily Mail during the previous week, explaining in great detail precisely how (and by whom) the film had been funded? Why did many of them claim that I had displayed a “shocking” photograph of Diana in her death throes, when no such photograph was ever included?

Why did they claim that there was nothing new in the film, when this is the first ever reconstruction and analysis of the longest inquest in British legal history? And when (to take just one of many examples) it highlights the apparent discrepancy between evidence given under oath by Sir Robert Fellowes (the Queen’s private secretary and Diana’s brother-in-law), who said he was on holiday during the period before and after Diana’s death, and entries in the newly published diaries of Alastair Campbell which suggest that he was overseeing Diana’s funeral arrangements?

And why, three years on, is most of the UK press still unwilling to accept the verdict of the inquest jury, which decided that the Alma tunnel crash was not an accident but an “unlawful killing” (the coroner having denied them the option of “murder”), and that unidentified “following vehicles” (not the paparazzi, as was incorrectly reported) had been a principal cause?

What the British press writes does not greatly matter, because over the next few months, people all around the world will have the chance to see the film, and to form their own judgements. Everywhere except Britain, that is, because as things stand, I am legally prevented from screening the film in the UK.

That’s not primarily because of fears about libel, as has been suggested by some journalists (although much of the information that we have unearthed about Prince Philip will shock many viewers), but because my film has been deemed by lawyers to be in contempt of court, since it openly questions the impartiality of a coroner who had sworn an oath of allegiance to the Queen, yet was sitting in the Royal Courts of Justice, presiding over a case that involved the monarchy.

Furthermore, it dares to look at why he repeatedly refused to call senior members of the royal family to the inquest, despite Diana having written a sworn note explicitly stating that her husband was planning an “accident” to her car (a note, incidentally, which the Metropolitan Police did not reveal to the press and public for six years, or the French police who first investigated the crash). Saying this explicitly is, it seems, against the law.

This isn’t just a whinge from a thin-skinned director, piqued by a handful of negative reviews. We are living in a time when oppressive judges routinely prevent the British press from publishing information of genuine public interest, and my film has fallen foul of that same authoritarian repression.

Whatever journalists may think about Diana’s death, surely they should always be in favour of the disclosure of information. That way, the British public can decide for itself whether Diana was simply the victim of a drunk driver (as most of the UK press insist was the case), or whether (as is my contention) the inquest was a shameless establishment cover-up, a modern-day version of the notorious Dreyfus case, in which the British press has (until now) played a shameful and obsequious supporting role.

Either way, my film – like Diana – will not go quietly.


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6 COMMENTS

  1. I noticed the MSM is putting out a new version with “never before heard eyewitness testimony” about “hearing her last words”. The summation is that she had a cardiac arrest as she was being extracted from the vehicle. Really? I worked EMS for years and never experienced, or ever heard of, someone having a cardiac arrest from being taken out of a vehicle. Utter and complete codswallop, as the brits would say.

  2. Yeah, she didn’t die, JFK wasn’t shot, nukes are fake, the earth is flat and the moon is made of cheese…..

    Is there a crazy conspiracy theory you don’t believe?

  3. Although the house of Windsor embodies and personifies many evils in today’s world, they had a nice healthy tradition of not choosing brides and mates for them by themselves rather based on rational aristocratic connections through their older mated members. Diana didn’t fit in that description with her outgoing altruist character and immediate sympathy. The problem is that younger generations of princes earls etc. will be even more distant from any tradition, which could turn the notorious Windsor house even into likeable and charitable entity unlike their usual image of sabre dancing morons promoting gun sales, global eugenics and endless acres of properties for a few laughs at horse racing.

    • Actually, if you research the lineages of Diana and Kate Middleton, you will find that both are part of the Goldsmith family and there is an allegation that the Windsors are actually Rothschilds. Which then leads us to the edict of Mayer Amschel Rothschild way back in 18th century Frankfurt that the Rothschilds heirs must marry only within the extended family or the Goldsmiths who were their closest business partners and lived next door in the Frankfurt ghetto.

  4. After her amazing success with the banning of land mines, Princess Diana did indeed turn her focus to the plight of the Palestinians. It is a little known fact that the allegedly drunk chauffeur Henri Paul was an ex Mossad agent and the Ritz Hotel was crawling with secret service agents supposedly monitoring a multi million pound arms deal.

    Just like the Mercedes which sped up and killed journalist Michael Hastings, the vehicle Diana was travelling in had just returned from a workshop after a service.

  5. I am certainly not a supporter of the Royals, especially when the Queen gave the nod for the Americans to expel the local inhabitants from Diego Garcia, brilliantly portrait in Pilgers doco “Stealing a nation”..
    The Queen also hasn’t visited the zionist apartheid state of Israel, I think the only thing I like about her.
    Diana the peoples princess, I wonder if she was starting to get interested in the plight of the Palestinians? If the NSA/MI5 was listening to her, the zionists would also know.
    I have never seen the above doco movie, very well made.

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