FFWN: Can false flag awareness stop World War 3?

The Skripal-Douma operation needs to blow up in their faces

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On September 11, 2001, the only people who knew what false flag meant were the professional strategists who teach the tactic in military academies. Today, almost everyone has at least heard of the concept.

Unfortunately, the world needs far more false flag education than it’s getting. Exhibit A: Trump’s recent bombing of Syria. That war crime (like so many war crimes) was triggered by  false flags: the “Skripal poisoning” and the “Douma poison gas attack.” Both of these stories were obvious hoaxes. No sane, educated adult could possibly believe that Putin would poison a swapped spy with an exotic nerve agent and hand NATO hawks a PR bonanza. Nor could any serious person accept the absurd story of Assad pointlessly dropping chemicals on children at the exact moment of his hard-earned victory.

Somehow, though, the fake news mainstream media has gotten away with peddling those ludicrous lies, and many more. Throngs with torches and pitchforks have not yet burned their studios to the ground. Obviously those of us in the false flag education business need to work harder.

So that is exactly what we are going to do here at False Flag Weekly News. Please help us by contributing and spreading the word.

4 COMMENTS

  1. I had a discussion with one of my bright sons as to the accurate meaning of “Cognitive Dissonance”. In particular, we were using 9/11 as an example. My take is that a person can “witness” on TV that two planes, apparently, hit two buildings and then three buildings of approximately 200,000 tons of steel and 800,000 tons of concrete dropped into their footprints at free fall speed, with a large proportion of the population believing what they saw on TV. Now I studied Fifth Form Physics and they told me S=UT + 1/2AT2, Distance equals Initial Velocity times Time plus one half Acceleration Due to Gravity (32 feet per second) squared. I banged my head against a brick wall a few times and realised the futility of that and witnessed a couple of telegraph poles rippng the wings of a Super Constellation that was taxiing fast.

    On one hand it might be possible for a very poorly educated public to believe the story on the TV, which is backgrounded by the gravitas of an institution. However, one of my nephews is a Civil Engineer and expressed skepticism over my assertions of a clear False Flag. Given his Technical and Scientific training, he know the impossibility of the event as outlined. Yet he still thought that it happened “as seen on TV”.

    Is this a clear example of Cognitive Dissonance? Maybe only a small proportion of the population can overcome this. Kevin is doing a Sterling Job trying to induce the realisation that “the world is ruled by the Prince of Lies”. Now that is The Gospel Truth.

  2. FB won’t allow this article to be shared. (((Some people))) have complained of its “abusive content.” We know who those people are.

    “If you want to know who rules over you, just ask yoursesf whom you’re not allowed to criticize.”

  3. Discernment is very hard to teach, when abundance reinforces obedience. It is getting better though.

    Comfortable primates are reluctant to disturb any system that supports comfort. But they do love to investigate , peek into each others windows and whisper about scandal.
    Academia needs a reality check and we should single them out one at a time, and bring their overly inflated credibility to question. Schools of journalism in particular. For instance, the professor from MSU “Sue Carter, a Michigan State University journalism professor, resigned Wednesday as the faculty athletic representative and chair of the university’s Athletic Council. Carter, who also is an ordained Episcopal priest, said she disagrees with the university’s “ineffective response” to the Larry Nassar scandal.” She was in it , and didn’t see it.????????? I question MSU’s ability to teach journalism.

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