US Economic Gunboat Diplomacy is in full bloom

US allies find themselves in the position of supplicants with their having to ask for waivers on the sanctions.

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…from Press TV, Tehran

Is America going backwards now?

[ Editor’s Note: Welcome to the new uni-polarism world, where the US tells everyone who they can and cannot do business with, paying no attention whatsoever to the violation of international agreements that involves.

It is squarely out in the open that the US holds itself free from any past agreements that it does not feel suit US “interests”, now. I smell more than a little whiff of the Deep State operators in all this.

Even US allies find themselves in the position of supplicants with their having to ask for waivers on the sanctions. Friends and enemies are treated alike, via Mr. Trump’s attitude of “My way, or the highway”. The basis of US foreign policy has become preemptive economic warfare.

If the US wants to sell expensive LNG to Europe, it claims the right to attack cheaper Russian supplies via pipeline. If it desires to make Japan, China and India more dependent on oil supplies from US-ally Saudi Arabia, it moves to sanction their buying oil from Iran.

The US not only has broken its JCPOA agreement, but will now punish all those who do not accept its doing so by threatening retaliation for not “obeying” illegal US sanctions. This is the kind of behavior one would expect when dealing with thugs and gangsters.

Americans need to wake up, and face the risks to all of us from uni-polarism. I don’t see it even being discussed as an issue in the mid-term elections. What am I missing that is causing the electorate to be so ho-hum about this dangerous issue?Jim W. Dean ]

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– First published … June 27,2018

An Iranian oil official says removing Iran’s crude oil from the market is impossible after the US said it expected oil buyers to completely cut off purchases of Iranian supplies in early November.

The State Department confirmed Tuesday that it was taking a hard line on sanctions enforcement, telling Iran’s oil buyers they should not expect any waivers to US sanctions that snap back in November.

“This big claim is not feasible because last month Iran shipped 2.8 million barrels of crude oil and gas condensate daily; this figure now stands at around 2.5 million barrels and eliminating it easily and in a period of a few months is impossible,” the official at Iran’s Ministry of Petroleum told Tasnim news agency Wednesday.

The US announcement on Tuesday caused crude prices to surge by more than 3 percent to around $77 on Tuesday amid concerns about a shortage of oil at a time of supply disruptions from Canada, Libya and Venezuela.

“We will certainly be requesting that their [Iranian] oil imports go to zero, without question,” a senior State Department official told reporters during a background briefing.

Bob McNally, president of Rapidan Energy Group and former energy adviser to President George W. Bush, said, “If the US succeeds at zeroing out Iran’s exports, it will have a big price problem at the pump around election time that Saudi Arabia cannot fix.”

The State Department briefing came shortly after reports that Saudi Arabia plans to pump 10.8 million barrels per day (bpd) in July, which would exceed its current record high monthly output of 10.66 million bpd set in August 2016.

Elizabeth Rosenberg, a former senior sanctions adviser at the Treasury Department, told Platts that the US will face an “extraordinarily difficult” task in cutting off all Iran oil trades, “particularly if the US administration is still only in the process of conveying this message to Iran’s oil purchasers.”

Japan and South Korea said Wednesday they are in talks with the US government to get waivers similar to what they received during the previous round of sanctions that allowed them to buy oil from Iran.

The two countries are two of Iran’s major oil customers along with China and India.

“Japan and the US are in talks now on re-application of US sanctions against Iran, and I decline to reveal the details of the discussions,” Japan’s Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga told a news conference in Tokyo.

“We are watching carefully the impact that the US measure would cause, and we would like to negotiate with countries involved including the United States so as not to have an adverse impact on Japanese firms,” he added.

In South Korea, Reuters quoted an Energy Ministry official as saying that the government would keep negotiating with the US in order to get an exemption from the sanctions.

“We are in the same position as Japan. We are in talks with the United States and will keep negotiating to get an exemption,” said the official.


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7 COMMENTS

  1. All of the money spent on defense seems more to be money spent on offense at this point. Does he really think that he is going to rule the world?? Is he deliberately isolating us from all of our friends and allies? Does he really think that globalists are not going to betray him like they do everyone else? Is he really that stupid? Israel is no friend nor ally but he keeps bowing to their wishes. He is setting us up!!

  2. The good thing is that the US share of global GDP shrinking along with its relevance influence. A declining economy cannot support debt creation forever. These are the actions borne of decline and desperation.

  3. VT readers are long aware of the USS Liberty. But doing promos in the comments is a form of spamming. If we let one to it, then the flood gates open. The USS Liberty Association one of the most widely known veteran “event related” groups that we now of. The number of Veterans groups is huge beyond belief, and there is not way we can be a bulletin board for them all. The comment boards are for for VT readers to comment, and mostly related to the article. That is why we have comment reader traffic. Once the oomment boards become a bulletin board it makes readers have to read through unrelated material to find that this is, which is not fair to them or us. Thanks for understanding

  4. The rest of the world should give both the U.S. and Israel their large middle finger and boycott everything going to or coming from these arrogant cesspool gangsters. If it takes WWIII to bring thee criminals down, so be it. The longer you tolerate bullies, the worse it gets. The major cities of the U.S. New York, Miami, Chicago, LA and SF have skipped being bombed in earlier wars like Germany was. Teach these gangster criminals what a real bombing run is like with nukes. An object lesson is long overdue for the criminal outlaws in the U.S.

  5. ?The Americans are now Just Going to Prove to the World that They ain’t got no one that respects them anymore and that Nobody cares What USA orders . there is only a limited sphere to which USA can do but Prohibiting Iranian Oil Sales is just plain stupid and Impossible to do …..

  6. And the “soft” civil war starts in the usa. Non linear media attacks have the population fractured and ready to explode over every issue. Logic be dammed as foreign policy throws free market to the bin.

  7. Trump regime takes advantage of it’s position as leader of the world’s greatest army by running a protection racket and playing, no creating, short and long opportunities in the stock markets. Very simple plan, illegal but, it can’t be stopped. Our military is now openly used for the benefit of the Russian mob (based in NYC and London). The good news is any outsider who want’s to try their hand at predicting Trump’s next tweet and, the effect it will have on Wall St., can play along. Hey buddy … can I borrow a dime?

Comments are closed.