Guardian: Online, no one knows you’re poor

 ‘I never shared online the time that we looked at our bank account and saw $85 left for the month

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 ‘I never shared online the time that we looked at our bank account and saw $85 left for the month.’ 

Shauna M Ahern used to make her living by writing a food blog. But when times got tough, she realised keeping up appearances can make you lose sight of life’s meaning

by 

I arrive at six in the morning, two hours before the store opens. Awaiting me is an aisle of boxes, stacked up. One last sip of my coffee, then I put on my gloves and take a big breath. Time to go in.

I am a James Beard award–winning gluten‑free cookbook author. And for nine months, I worked in our local grocery store for $15 an hour.

It is the best job I have ever worked.

Online, no one knows you are poor. No one is posting photos of the basket of bills overflowing, some of the envelopes with urgent stamped on them. Very few people write about the choices they make out of fear of going bankrupt, like selling expensive camera lenses that feel less important than rent. And few of us want to admit that we are struggling with money, even though we live in a culture where the rich have grown astronomically rich and the rest of us have grown anxious about health insurance. As my friend Ashley Ford wrote online one day: “I’m trying to choose an insurance plan, but I’m pretty sure the only good insurance is wealth.”

read more:

https://www.theguardian.com/money/2019/oct/08/online-poor-part-time-job


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1 COMMENT

  1. “And for nine months, I worked in our local grocery store for $15 an hour.

    It is the best job I have ever worked.” – S.J. Ahern

    Back in the mid 1990s I worked in a grocery store evenings and weekends (well, mostly in the parking lot pulling in 20+ shopping carts at a time with a rope) for wages that started at $4.90/hour and rose to $5.50/hour over the 2½ years I was there. Still better (even in the hottest and coldest days of the year in Wisconsin) that working inside and putting up with middle class customers for a couple of dollars per hour more.