…from Sputnik News, Moscow

[ Editor’s Note: This has been a long time coming from the EU, but better late than never. The good news is that political regions will have their own payment system with what we would expect would be national security protection.

Some feel until the Israelis are under control on their worldwide espionage operations, no government is safe. Maintaining security is a never-ending and resource intensive process.

Talent turnover is when a lot of threats can occur. When you lose a $100k-per-year guy who gets picked up for $250K, you can assume the new employer is going to want to turn the new guy inside out on what the old employer has. Welcome to the world.

They all play this game, looking for disgruntled employees, both businesses and national Intelligence agencies. I fear the sparring and jousting will be with us forever.

Don’t write off on intelligence agencies penetrating a growing home country competitor and hacking their system to discredit it publicly. Just assume it will be done. Online will never be safe. All of us have to keep that in mind ALL the time in terms of deciding how much we want to do onlineJim W. Dean ]

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Gone are the good old days when you could just walk down stairs to make sure it was still there. Jim Dean’s basement, 1979. No…just kidding. This was a drug lord’s stash, for a while.

– First published … November 06,2019

The European Central Bank (BCE) has long been mulling over a sovereign all-European payment network that would handle all types of non-cash transactions, but now it appears to have finally got things rolling.

As many as twenty European banks are seeking a pan-European payment system to BCE effectively rival the commonly used Visa and Mastercard, as well as technology monopolists like Google and PayPal, EU banking and government officials confirmed at a conference organised by the banking magazine, Revue Banque, on Tuesday.

The brand new Pan-European Payment System Initiative (PEPSI) is aimed at managing all forms of non-cash payments, with Carlo Bovero, responsible for Global Cards at BNP Paribas, noting there have been discussions involving an extensive range of banks across Europe on the issue.

According to a French banking source cited by the Brussels Times, the initiative goes back to “positive injunctions” in 2017 from the European Central bank (BCE), which expressed concerns about the “sovereignty of payments”, going on to assert it would this “view favourably ” if the issue was looked into.

“PEPSI started out not as a technical initiative but a political one”, added the source, picking up on the still unrivaled dominance of Visa and Mastercard in Europe as well as the increasing leverage of Chinese payment systems also wishing to jump into the banking market.

According to Jerome Reboul, a senior French treasury official told the Revue Banque conference that “in the past two years opinions on the future of payments has changed considerably” across Europe.

Apart from US card companies, Europeans are also looking for an alternative to US and Chinese technology giants such as Google and Alipay.

Earlier, a board member of Deutsche Bundesbank, Germany’s central bank and one of the vital components of the European System of Central Banks urged EU states to come up with new payment systems that would be alternative to American ones.

Russia is among the countries that launched its own payment system – MIR – in April 2015, after Visa and Mastercard had denied services to some Russian banks in the wake of US-imposed sanctions.


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