Police Dogs in Texas No longer Have To Be Sold or Euthanized Upon Retirement

5
1236
www.pinterest.com

Health Editor’s Note:  I cannot understand why a wonderfully trained dog would every had to be euthanized or sold when it reaches retirement age. It seems that the handler/partner would/should be allowed to continue the partnership with his or her canine partner after the canine is relieved of duties. These animals are obedience trained as well as trained for his or her job type be it drug sniffing, etc. They are perfect canine citizens. One of us should be so lucky to have one of these fine creatures in our home.  I can only hope that Texas was the only state which followed the bizarre practice of killing awesome dogs that had performed a great service. Apparently this issue went to a vote of the citizens of Texas to remove this travesty. Gosh, sometimes you learn some really creepy stuff…..Carol 

Texas’ Retired Police Dogs No Longer Have to Be Sold or Euthanized
by Jason Daley/Smithsonian.com

This Election Day, voters in Texas banded together to pass a constitutional amendment on a decidedly bipartisan issue: dogs. The new ruling allows retired police dogs to be adopted by their handler or another qualified caretaker at no cost. Previously, Texas’ K-9 cops had to be euthanized or auctioned off upon reaching retirement.

As Chase Karacostas reports for the Texas Tribune, state law classifies retired law enforcement animals as surplus government property not to be used for private benefit. The amendment offers a workaround to this stipulation, enabling police pups to stay with their human partners indefinitely.

“It’s the right thing to do,” Collin County Sheriff Jim Skinner, chair of the local sheriffs’ association’s legislative committee, tells the Washington Post’s Karin Brulliard. “There’s been a lot of great dogs with great handlers, and the right thing should have been done by them. But it’s better late than never.”

Skinner, who assumed leadership of the local sheriff’s office in 2017, served as a K-9 handler in the Air Force nearly 40 years ago. He extended his tour of duty in the Philippines multiple times in order to spend more time with his furry partner, Jessie. According to Karacostas, Skinner knew that Jessie, a military service dog classified as government property, would likely be euthanized upon retiring.

Read more:


Loading...

EDITORIAL DISCLOSURE
All content herein is owned by author exclusively.  Expressed opinions are NOT necessarily the views of VT, authors, affiliates, advertisers, sponsors, partners, technicians or Veterans Today Network (VT).  Some content may be satirical in nature. 
All images within are full responsibility of author and NOT VT.
About VT - Read Full Policy Notice - Comment Policy

5 COMMENTS

  1. Mrs. Duff,

    That is a Wonderful News!
    What is this with us, that we love to kill, war, etc.?

    __’’To “Every Vet Who Served USA & Your Families Who Scarified A Lot,
    __Thank You So Much

    __May God Help the Wounded & Those with PTSD, Who are getting to the point of taking their lives

    __Both House of Congress & Both Parties, All they know is “Simply go around the World,
    __Act like Rambo & send Our Troops to War”

    __What is Even Worse is that, those Generals, Who are Eager to Agree with Congress,
    __Is it to get get Medals? I wonder.

  2. Nice!!

    In looking at “how” these types of things are originally put in to law, etc., I think the premise might have been, these are police dogs, and they can bite, hard. BUT . . . a trained dog is under command. They do not act unless they hear the master’s voice with their “barking” orders. So, maybe the sale or put down was in the “best interest of public?” Now, it’s in the best interest of the canine and his/her officer. I like that.

    But, these high energy dogs, like the German Shepard Schutzhund, which are typically the breed police agencies purchase, or should, are intelligent, take command and are great companion dogs later, after service.

    SO — great Sunday read. Thanks!

    His Master’s Voice . . . ah, the Victorla era . . . for all