Henry V: Warrior King

3
1833
Henry V's nine-year reign saw a flourishing of royal authority and military action but ended abruptly with his untimely death in 1422 (Photos via Netflix and iStock; Photo Illustration by Meilan Solly)

Health Editor’s Note: Two days ago saw this Netflix movie and I am still thinking about it.  The battle between the French and English at Agincourt, in my estimation,  puts every other “movie produced” battle to shame. While there is a strong political message in this production, it is well worth watching and yes, contemplating how Henry offered to fight Charles d’Albret, man to man, and leave both sides of soldiers out of the mix, and d’Alvret’s refusal, and what that meant for England and France. Henry’s prebattle speech puts Shakespeare’s St. Crispin’s Day speech to shame.  …..Carol 

The True Story of Henry V, England’s Warrior King

by Meilan Solly/Smithsonian.com

Henry V was a man of contradictions.

In youth, he was reportedly an “assiduous cultivator of lasciviousness,” but upon ascending to the throne of England in the early 15th century, he won plaudits for his piety. Henry was a formidable warrior—perhaps the greatest the country has ever seen—but thanks to his closely cropped haircut, looked more like a priest than a soldier. He had a reputation for prudent judgment and chivalrous behavior, but in the aftermath of his victory at Agincourt, took the unprecedented step of ordering the execution of all unarmed prisoners. His legacy is one of success, but as historian Peter Ackroyd argues, the triumphs of his military conquests soon faded, leaving “very little … to celebrate” and lending credence to the idea that “all was done for the pride of princes.”

The King, a new biopic starring Timothée Chalamet as its eponymous monarch, examines these seemingly discordant aspects of Henry’s life by tracing its subject’s path from wayward adolescent to heroic warrior. As a newly crowned Henry declares in the movie’s trailer, “A new chapter of my life has begun. … As prince, I spent my days drinking, clowning. Now, I find myself king.”

Read more:


Loading...

EDITORIAL DISCLOSURE
All content herein is owned by author exclusively.  Expressed opinions are NOT necessarily the views of VT, authors, affiliates, advertisers, sponsors, partners, technicians or Veterans Today Network (VT).  Some content may be satirical in nature. 
All images within are full responsibility of author and NOT VT.
About VT - Read Full Policy Notice - Comment Policy

Previous articleRussia sets up helicopter base in northeast Syria
Next articleMeasles Infection Causes Immunity Amnesia
Biography
Carol graduated from Riverside White Cross School of Nursing in Columbus, Ohio and received her diploma as a registered nurse. She attended Bowling Green State University where she received a Bachelor of Arts Degree in History and Literature. She attended the University of Toledo, College of Nursing, and received a Master's of Nursing Science Degree as an Educator.

She has traveled extensively, is a photographer, and writes on medical issues. Carol has three children RJ, Katherine, and Stephen - two daughters-in-law; Suzy and Katie - two granddaughters; Isabella Marianna and Zoe Olivia - and one grandson, Alexander Paul. She also shares her life with husband Gordon Duff, many cats, two rescue pups, and two guinea pigs.

Carol's Archives 2009-2013

3 COMMENTS

  1. Referring to France’s Henri iV, we were told at school that he was murdered by a lone Assassin by the name of Ravaillac! Really, it sounds like LHO, Sirhan Sirhan, L W Boots, you name it. I was a boy and I accepted the school’s version but not anymore when I understood what lay behind these murders. I do not know if VT editors have studied the case of that king of France and the real reason of his brutal murder.