The French national railway company is known as the SNCF or Société Nationale des Chemins de Fer Français. It covers over 32,000 km of railway roads and the tickets can be booked well in advance. Apart from the local trains, the international ones connect France with countries like Italy and England. Such French cities as Nice, Lyon, and Paris are also easily accessible on the train.

Actually, it is the simplest way of traveling between different towns and cities inside the country with the maximum convenience of a ground level. The most famous French train, TGV, can accelerate to 199 mph and take you from one city center to another. The prices are rather low: when booking in advance you will need to pay only 20 Euros.

And to prove that train is the best way to see France, let us name only some of the most popular and delicious restaurants, which are situated close to the main train stations in Paris: Gare Du Nord au Beaujolais, Les Arlots, Gare de Lyon le Duc de Richelieu, and Le Cremieux. However, the recent train collapse made us question whether tourists and locals still have a chance to travel using the railway. Let’s try and find out the answer.

What we know about the train collapse

Thousands of travelers had to change their plans while the national strike has unfolded. For the past several weeks, the transport and other services were working only partially to support protests against the offered pension reform. Thursday was called the day of action, so even more workers went out to the streets.

While Eurostar workers are not participating, the cross-Channel operator had to face restrictions on the number of trains that could run on the network. This operator canceled eight trains between London and Paris, and a round trip to Brussels. Luckily, citizens and guests don’t have to be bored: the finest of local and international online casinos in France provide users with the utmost gambling experience wherever they are stuck at the railway station and waiting to leave, you will always have something to kill time with!

After severe street and transport protests took place across France on the National Mobilization Day on Thursday, the situation looks a bit better. However, the deadlock remains and the unions demand the government to block the reform or they will have to face even a harsher protest.

Here’s how the Paris SNCF trains are operating at the moment: four out of five regular TGV high-speed services are working as usual. This includes 70% of the Ouigo services. Three out of five Transilien trains in the bigger Paris region and 1/3 of the Intercity routes are also running.

However, a few weeks ago the situation wasn’t that positive and the Christmas holidays usually the busiest time for the railway, took place under the noises of protests. Unions understood that many people won’t be able to spend holidays with their families but thought that it was the government that should be blamed. Luckily, starting with January 16, SNCF promises almost normal services on the national and regional trains, so it is the right time to plan the next trip.

How to enjoy the ride

If you were lucky enough to buy a train ticket, it is the right time to plan what you are going to do during the journey. Apart from listening to music, reading books or having some snacks we recommend socializing, playing video games, listening to an audiobook or a podcast, and meditating. It is also a great opportunity to decide what you are going to do after the arrival: make a map, note down addresses of restaurants and sightseeing places.

Not to miss a single detail don’t forget to make a list of the things to take to a train ride. Who needs to stress out about forgetting a passport or a camera?

France is always glad to see you

Even though the country is experiencing not the best times, it is obvious that tourists won’t be scared away and will continue coming to France to enjoy unique cuisine, architecture, beautiful nature, and communication with one of the best nations in the world.

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