Neanderthals: Were They Clam Divers?

To Craft Cutting Tools, Neanderthals Dove for Clam Shells on the Ocean Floor

4
600
Clam shells, likely collected from live clams, would have made for naturally sharp cutting tools. (Villa et al., 2020)

by Meghan Gannon, Smithsonianmag.com

Archaeological evidence has upended our image of Neanderthals in the last couple of decades. We’ve learned that these extinct human relatives may have decorated their bodies, buried their dead and even created art. These behaviors make them seem much more like our own species, Homo sapiens than previously believed. And according to a new study in the journal PLOS ONE, we can add another skill to the Neanderthals’ resume: diving for clams.

About 90,000 years ago, Neanderthals living on the Italian Peninsula between what is now Rome and Naples waded offshore into the Mediterranean Sea. Seeking clamshells, they reached their hands underwater, and perhaps even held their breath to swim down to the sandy seafloor. Back on the beach, they broke open the mollusks and maybe enjoyed eating some of the raw meat inside, but they were primarily interested in the shells themselves.

With thin, sharp edges, these shells were essentially natural knives. Instead of spending the better part of a day carving blades from hunks of rock, Neanderthals could find the tools by venturing to the beach. They might have gathered some dead and dried out clams that had washed up on the shore, …..

Read Full Article at SmithsonianMag.com

Biography
Carol graduated from Riverside White Cross School of Nursing in Columbus, Ohio and received her diploma as a registered nurse. She attended Bowling Green State University where she received a Bachelor of Arts Degree in History and Literature. She attended the University of Toledo, College of Nursing, and received a Master’s of Nursing Science Degree as an Educator.

She has traveled extensively, is a photographer, and writes on medical issues. Carol has three children RJ, Katherine, and Stephen – two daughters-in-law; Suzy and Katie – two granddaughters; Isabella Marianna and Zoe Olivia – and one grandson, Alexander Paul. She also shares her life with husband Gordon Duff, many cats, two rescue pups, and two guinea pigs.

Carol’s Archives 2009-2013
DISCLOSURES: All content herein is owned by author exclusively.  Expressed opinions are NOT necessarily the views of VT, authors, affiliates, advertisers, sponsors, partners or technicians. Some content may be satirical in nature. All images within are full responsibility of author and NOT VT.

About VT - Read Full Policy Notice - Comment Policy

4 COMMENTS

  1. “these extinct human relatives” talking about Neanderthals. That is non sense to put it politely! Again one should look at their bones density and strength, the skull and the eye sockets in the skull. These prove simply that Neanderthals can see very well at night, while we humans cannot. It tells also that Neanderthals with their strong bones can develop strong muscles. The reason for strong and dense bones is that they can handle strong torques provided by muscles or else the bones will snap. In essence, you have a tall, healthy and strong upright walking apes, not a human ancestor. Again, ask yourself: Mother Nature does a great job. Going from an healthy and strong upright walking ape, who walks better than us and can see at night to us with almost all the contrary of these beasties plus our 4 000+ genetic defects is a hell of improvement if evolution has to be accepted! Where I am surprised is that Denisova which was recently discovered but only with fragment bones had already been genetically mapped and proven to have 46 chromosomes like us. While Neanderthals have been discovered long ago with many complete skeleton, scientists so far have not given us their number of chromosomes. Isn’t it strange? I wonder why but I can feel the reasons for that…

    • …I have already developed several times the tale of the Sumerian tables, quoting the expert Zecharia Stichin previously. Also he accepted Darwin’s theory of evolution, he made the assumption after reading and interpreting the tables that the upright walking ape wrongly named “Homo Erectus” was the candidate for the genetic manipulation to be used to create the GMOs that we humans are. The late Lloyd Pye had another take, he was more inclined that Neanderthal was used instead and refined in these genetic manipulations. In essence, he is right to assume that a Neanderthal upright walking ape like female gametes/ovums were used for the genetic manipulations. What is clear is that the creature chromosomes numbers 2 and 3 have been fused by genetic manipulations to match it with the gamete of the Annunaki candidates, which would have 23 chromosomes ( implying that the Annunaki also have 46 chromosomes). When the match and alignment of both gametes were successful, they created, after many trials and many monsters, an hydrid chimerical creature: The Adamu- The so called Humans later who turn out to have 23 +23 = 46 chromosomes in their cell nucleus….

    • I have never heard of any clam digger having to “dive” for clams. Ask any clam digger. There are plenty around.