CDC: ‘Prepare For Coronavirus Spread in the U.S’.

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Health Editor’s Note: According to the CDC there are currently 14 cases of COVID-19, associated with travel, in the U.S. Added to this figure are 43 cases of this viral infection brought here from Wuhan, China and the Diamond Princess cruise ship.  As COVID-19 spreads to more countries, the primary focus will not be on preventing spread, but on what to do if there are wide-spread viral infestations.

When a disease has become pandemic, it has been able to spread to any place that was previously protected from it. While there are various states and facilities that can perform the test for COVID-19, these samples still must come to the CDC for reading/results. One of the main issues will be to decrease contact with others, especially anyone showing symptoms that may be indicative of COVID-19 infection…..Carol  

Coronavirus Spread in the U.S.: When, Not If

Molly Walker, Associate Editor/MedPage Today

The U.S. should prepare for community transmission of the COVID-19 coronavirus, CDC officials said on Tuesday.

“We expect to see community spread [of COVID-19] in this country. It’s not a question of ‘if’ anymore,” said Nancy Messonnier, MD, director of the CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, on a media call.

Currently, the U.S. has 14 COVID-19 cases that are travel-associated or in close contacts of travelers, and 43 cases from citizens brought home from the Diamond Princess cruise ship and Wuhan, China. But she cited the “rapidly evolving and expanding” situation, including the explosion of sustained person-to-person community spread in a variety of countries, including South Korea, Italy, Iran, Japan, Taiwan, Thailand, and Singapore.

As the world inches closer to worldwide spread, and the final criterion of a pandemic, Messonnier acknowledged the previous strategy of containing the disease at the borders may no longer be enough to stop it. The strategy would then shift from a containment strategy to mitigation, she said.

“I had this conversation at the breakfast table,” she said. “I told my children I didn’t think we were at risk right now, but we as a family need to start preparing for significant disruptions to our lives.” Messonnier added that she’d contacted her local school superintendent to ask what they were doing to prepare for potential community spread of COVID-19.

In the vein of “when, not if” the U.S. will experience community spread, she advised people to ask whether their providers have telemedicine capability, and said parents should consider “what to do about childcare” if schools are closed.

Messonnier outlined community mitigation guidelines, based on those outlined for pandemic influenza a decade ago. These non-pharmaceutical interventions include personal practices, including covering coughs and washing hands, as well as community and environmental measures such as surface cleaning.

Community measures are the most dire, and include social distancing, or limiting contact in face-to-face settings, employing such options as closing schools, telework or teleschool for children, and recommending that cities potentially “modify, postpone, or cancel mass gatherings.”

This included a special advisory for the healthcare system: triaging patients, conducting patient visits via telemedicine, and delaying elective surgeries.

Obviously, this would be based on the outbreak’s severity and breadth, but CDC called on a variety of industries, including the healthcare, education, and business sectors, to start preparing now because when the virus hits the community, it hits quite rapidly.

“The disruption to everyday life may be severe, but these are things we need to start thinking about right now,” Messonnier noted.

She added that 12 state and local health departments currently have the diagnostic test for COVID-19, but the tests still come to CDC for confirmation. She anticipated commercial laboratories would be coming online with their own tests, as it becomes “more and more important clinicians have a full toolkit.”

“We are working as fast as we can, and we understand the frustration of our partners within the healthcare sector,” Messonnier said.

While the case definition of COVID-19 is still travel-associated, Messonnier said that may change based on information in other countries and when they had new information about case definitions, they would “publicize it broadly.”

She ended with the caveat that she’s not sure if community spread of COVID-19 will be mild or severe, but told a reporter it was better to be overprepared than underprepared.

“People are concerned about the situation. I would say rightfully so,” Messonnier said. “I’m concerned about the situation. CDC is concerned about the situation.”

Biography
Carol graduated from Riverside White Cross School of Nursing in Columbus, Ohio and received her diploma as a registered nurse. She attended Bowling Green State University where she received a Bachelor of Arts Degree in History and Literature. She attended the University of Toledo, College of Nursing, and received a Master’s of Nursing Science Degree as an Educator.

She has traveled extensively, is a photographer, and writes on medical issues. Carol has three children RJ, Katherine, and Stephen – two daughters-in-law; Suzy and Katie – two granddaughters; Isabella Marianna and Zoe Olivia – and one grandson, Alexander Paul. She also shares her life with husband Gordon Duff, many cats, and two rescue pups.

Carol’s Archives 2009-2013
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4 COMMENTS

  1. To date, the demonic CDC has tested a total of 426 patients in the entire nation. With asymptomatic latency period of up to 24 days, and mild cases mimicking colds or flu, the “under the radar” contagion is exponential. Corrupt CDC head of pandemics is Mossennier, sister of crooked Rod Rosenstein. You’re on your own on this ride.

  2. “The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1937 was awarded to Albert von Szent-Györgyi Nagyrápolt “for his discoveries in connection with the biological combustion processes, with special reference to vitamin C and the catalysis of fumaric acid”. Today, we know that Ascorbic Acid or Vitamin C is much more than a vitamin; it is a medicine!. The late Fred Klenner, M.D. was one of the scientific pioneers who proved many of the great healing properties of Vitamin C in humans. For example he cured all childhood viral diseases up to and including Polio before 1949. This vital information has been criminally obstructed and lied about by the totally corrupt FDA. Vitamin C even kills cancer cells without harming normal cells! The greatest chemist of the 20th century Linus Pauling, Ph.D., the only person to be awarded two solo Nobel Prizes, took 18 grams of Vitamin C every day; he lived until age 93. Not bad was it? It is not known if this will work on the current virus, but it is worth trying. Everyone should have bottle of 1000 mg tablets of Vitamin C on the breakfast table. I buy a bottle of 300 tablets for less than $9.00. This is less than 3 cents per tablet! Linus Pauling, Ph.D. took these tablets of Vitamin C because he had developed cancer. I choose Fred Klenner M.D. and Linus Pauling Ph.D. as my heroes. They were the best.

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