by Jim W. Dean, VT Editor, …with PressTV, Tehran

[ Editor’s Note: This Covid prison story came as no surprise. In both the pandemic preparation and the scramble for protection equipment and testing, the prisons and jails were at the end of the competition line.

The rationale for the would be that front line health care workers were more valuable due to the pending risk of the hospitals being over flooded, which some were, and their staff going down with Covid, adding to the medical and ensuing political risk of a botched response.

The US was hijacking en route protection equipment from other countries, and we learned this week that Israel’s Mossad did the same, gabbing their first batch of masks from an order for the UAE. Welcome to dog eat dog geopolitics.

Even worse were the reports from Syria of US helicopters dropping flares to burn wheat crops in areas that had been selling their wheat to Damascus. As officers were flying these choppers, we are now waiting to see if they are charged with the obvious war crime they engaged in. I would not bet a lot on that, if I were you.

Actually, the veterans themselves should take the lead on this. They should be demanding an investigation, not just the Vietnam vets who usually do most of the heavy lifting work, but the Afghan and Iraqi war Vets who were supported by the Nam Vets during their mistreatment for the Gulf War syndrome.

The prison guards and staff were an under the radar sacrifice, analogous to the nursing home staffs across much of the world. They lost out in the feverish competition for Covid resources. The British today admitted they had prioritized hospitals over nursing homes, and that it had been a mistake.

And the cherry on top is the orange buffoon’s attempt to blame it all on China and the WHO, but given his reputation for skimpy credibility, the claim is not going to bought by anyone other than the Trump koolaid drinkers Jim W. Dean ]

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– First aired … May 18, 2020

As the coronavirus is rapidly spreading across the United States, media reports are showing a similar trend behind bars. A new report by Reuters has found that figures announced by the federal government undercount the number of infections in correctional facilities.
A recent report by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention stated under 5-thousand cases of COVID-19 among inmates nationwide.

But Reuters’ report recorded more than 17-thousand cases which is three times higher than the official figure. The report warned that inadequate testing and reporting in jails and prisons would have serious consequences for health officials tracking the spread of the virus.

The investigation also raised concern that released inmates may have not been properly screened for COVID-19 before returning to the community. Over 90-thousand people have been killed and more than 1-point-5 million cases of infections reported in the country so far.

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4 COMMENTS

  1. “Even worse were the reports from Syria of US helicopters dropping flares to burn wheat crops in areas that had been selling their wheat to Damascus.” – JWD

    And Putin is too afraid of something to shoot down these helicopters – or is he a “double agent” playing both sides?

    • Somebody forgot to call Putin and tell about US helo operation. We have to hire new spies among US pilots.

  2. Very interesting and important article, Jim. Because it is a huge mass of people behind the bars. A month ago I’ve read somewhere that there are more people in jails in the USA than there were people in USSR’s GULAG system. However, they are people and despite the fact they are isolated, it is a great danger not to turn jails into Nazi’s death camps.
    I mentioned one important idea, expressed by Mr.Dean. About the US Veterans of modern wars. Are their voices heard, are their voices expressed? Do they have unity of ideas with those old but firm and clever Veterans from Vietnam, Korea wars? It is very important to stay in a row for all Veterans, demanding and struggling for the truth as it was in anti-Vietnam war movement. Because the civil people are unable to unite in such a way. Only if promoted by some revolutional powers.
    And one more personal observation. Since I speak English (without a Russian accent), I noticed this thing in connection with the viral situation: English-speaking people have more articular expression when talking, stronger breathing and stronger ejection of saliva particles in the air. In Russian, there is almost no such expression and breathing, the muscles and ligaments work a little differently.Only if the person has anatomical features of the speech apparatus. This may also be the reason why the virus is spreading faster somewhere? In the same prisons where space is limited, for example. Just curious..

    • There has been a problem in the Veterans community for a long time because, like so many other groups, their main focus is staying on top of their veterans benefits which is a kind of low grade war with Congress and the VA. Whenever anyone in the Vet community brings up making a big deal on political, or even defense issues in terms of increase budgets as a majority would support increased military funding on almost anything as “good for veterans”. I have seen a number of situations in the major vet orgs where discussions of weighing in critically on defense or political policy “would put the legislation we have pending for increased benefits, (or fixes needed) in danger. This is how the org leaders keep the membership in line. The happened once when a pro USS Liberty resolution had passed committee was up for a convention vote, and it was defeated due to, you guessed it, “putting our legislation at risks”. Another area is criticizing Israel in the vet orgs, for anything. It is a big no non…”would put our legislation in jeopardy”. This is the world we live in. The only way I would see around this is separate Vet orgs for political and policy issues.