India First To Find Effective Treatment for COVID-19

The therapy involves taking antibodies from the plasma of a person who has recovered from COVID-19 and transfusing those antibodies into an active coronavirus patient to help the immune system fight the infection.

4
880
Concept to represent the 2020 virus threat Coronavirus, blood in a test tube.

__________
Times of India
West Bengal To Start Plasma Therapy To Treat COVID-19 Patients

The therapy involves taking antibodies from the plasma of a person who has recovered from COVID-19 and transfusing those antibodies into an active coronavirus patient to help the immune system fight the infection.

Kolkata:

West Bengal has taken a major step towards starting plasma therapy to treat COVID-19 patients after a state-run hospital collected and preserved the blood component from a woman who recovered from the disease in March, a senior official of the health department said on Thursday.

The therapy involves taking antibodies from the plasma of a person who has recovered from COVID-19 and transfusing those antibodies into an active coronavirus patient to help the immune system fight the infection.

The collection and preservation of plasma have been done at the Department of Immunohaematology and Blood Transfusion of the Kolkata Medical College and Hospital on Wednesday after Monami Biswas donated blood for the purpose, the official said.

The 23-year-old woman from Habra in North 24 Parganas district recovered from the disease in March.

Blood plasma has been collected from Ms Biswas using Plasmapheresis method by a team of seven doctors headed by Prof Dr Prasun Bhattacharya.

“The collection and preservation of plasma have been done for the first time in the eastern part of the country, the official told PTI.

The woman, who was pursuing higher studies in Scotland, tested positive for COVID-19 after returning from abroad. She agreed to donate her blood plasma for treating such patients.

Ms Biswas was given chocolate, fruit juice and milkshake before the transfusion on Wednesday. Her body weight, blood pressure and body temperature were then noted and the process of plasma collection started, the official said.

The entire process lasted for around 50 minutes and around 410 millilitre of plasma was collected from her.

A cell separator machine was used to collect plasma from Ms Biswas, he added.

“After that, red blood cells, platelets and other components of blood were reinfused in her body. This is a highly complicated method but the process is quite similar to blood donation,” the official said.

Ms Biswas said she is happy to donate plasma for treating COVID-19 patients.

“It always feels great when you know that you have contributed to humanity. I was always willing to help people,” she said.

On Monday, a 28-year-old doctor of Tata Medical Centre who recently recovered from COVID-19 will also donate plasma, health department sources said.

At least 10 to 12 pouches of plasma will be enough to start plasma therapy of COVID-19 patients, the official added.

Author Details
Ian Greenhalgh is a photographer and historian with a particular interest in military history and the real causes of conflicts.

His studies in history and background in the media industry have given him a keen insight into the use of mass media as a creator of conflict in the modern world.

His favored areas of study include state-sponsored terrorism, media manufactured reality and the role of intelligence services in manipulation of populations and the perception of events.
ATTENTION READERS
Due to the nature of independent content, VT cannot guarantee content validity.
We ask you to Read Our Content Policy so a clear comprehension of VT's independent non-censored media is understood and given its proper place in the world of news, opinion and media.

All content is owned by author exclusively. Expressed opinions are NOT necessarily the views of VT, other authors, affiliates, advertisers, sponsors, partners or technicians. Some content may be satirical in nature. All images within are full responsibility of author and NOT VT.

About VT - Read Full Policy Notice - Comment Policy

4 COMMENTS

  1. I used to give plasma years ago when it took 2 hours, and now it’s 1 hour. The biggest problem with the CV19 direct plasma therapy is that 1 bag can only help 2 patients. However, antibodies can be cloned (or whatever they call it) and in that regard, here in the US, Sorrento Therapeutics is well on their way, waiting for FDA approval. The interesting thing is that they say they tested their library of antibodies and found 1 blockbuster. This blockbuster, they say, is so effective that it can be used as a “vaccine” to prevent CV19, and that could be within a couple of months of FDA approval. My assumption is that there are other companies doing something similar. If that’s the case, we could be looking at an antibody “vaccine” a few months from now, long before a regular vaccine is ready.

  2. What a miracle! You can collect plasma from an infected/recovered patient and and use those antibodies for therapeutic purposes? Wow, how is that even possible? (sarcasm) Let’s talk about what it takes to create an effective treatment this way. The process has been known and used for many decades. And if it is effective here, why is it not used to treat the thousands of patients who die from influenza and it’s complications?

    • I heard that it is an okay treatment but not the end all and be all anyway. If it really iis effective we will probably never hear much about it since it is not a vaccine.