[ Editor’s Note: Geopolitical plates are moving under the US, and by that, I don’t mean the Yellowstone plates. Former top defense officials are forming together to denounce what they feel are dangerous threats against America emanating from those currently in power, and their handlers.

I personally salute them for that effort, with the caveat that they did wait until Trump was down ten points in the polls and had done his stupidest stunt of all, claiming that he had the right and power to trigger the Insurrection Act, something that someone of the likes of Sean Hannity must have whispered in his ear, as I doubt Trump knew anything about it, like so many other things.

Even a rookie intelligence profiler could nail Trump for his Caesar complex. Of all world leaders, there is no one in his class in terms of having an inflated vision of himself.

This caught my attention right away when the approximately 2000 former Justice Department people came forward with their demand for Attorney General Barr, who will go down as a twin figure with Trump for never having served the American people, but for themselves and their somewhat covert backers, both domestic and foreign.

Sure, a lot of these names will be Democrats, but many are not. We are seeing a groundswell movement against a president because he is viewed as a national security risk, and we have a president so in love with himself he cannot even see it when he looks in the mirror.

Another shocker has been the employment of what to many was viewed as occupation troops hiding their identities. Rumors abounded for a few days until Politico ran a full disclosure on the army of before now out-of-sight Federal police forces, basically hidden from the American people. I just happened upon the article way down the page when it should have been near the top.

It starts with 132,000 in the DC area, 13 divisions, and then balloons from there, spreading out across the country, where almost every federal department seems to have its own hugely expensive police force. The article is a must read, save, and print out for everybody, a deep dive into the belly of the beast.

Most important of all, now is the time for all the other government employees at all levels to come forward to smack down Trump’s coup d’état. Call me an alarmist if you want, but I am seeing pre-staging here by Trump and gang where, if he loses the election, he will claim it was rigged and bring out the Insurrection Act to circle the wagons.

Trump acts like an idiot, but he is smart enough to know he is looking at a fall from grace that no American president has ever experienced. So he has nothing to lose by using whatever power he can muster to negotiate his way out of being prosecuted for his long list of items, including his family’s activities.

If he drops in the polls, get ready for more Trump claims that the Democrats intend to steal the election, and how he is going to defend the county “by all means necessary”. I hope I am wrong, but the threat is clearly in front of us now, physically. I could see it in the enjoyment of some of the Federal cops beating on non-violent young protesters.

It appears that Barr put the call out for quotas from some of these various forces to contribute people for riot duty, and you had some first-timers who were looking to crack some heads to tell bogus stories to their grandkids someday about how they fought off the rioters in front of the White House. We will need all hands on deck to beat this… Jim W. Dean ]

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Trump having a wet dream with Sisi (“my favorite dictator”), and the Saudi King being number two I guess

…by 89 former Defense officials

“We are alarmed at how the president is betraying this oath by threatening to order members of the U.S. military to violate the rights of their fellow Americans.”

– First published … June 05, 2020

President Trump continues to use inflammatory language as many Americans protest the unlawful death of George Floyd and the unjust treatment of black Americans by our justice system.

As the protests have grown, so has the intensity of the president’s rhetoric. He has gone so far as to make a shocking promise: to send active-duty members of the U.S. military to “dominate” protesters in cities throughout the country — with or without the consent of local mayors or state governors.

On Monday, the president previewed his approach on the streets of Washington. He had 1,600 troops from around the country transported to the D.C. area, and placed them on alert, as an unnamed Pentagon official put it, “to ensure faster employment if necessary.”

As part of the show of force that Trump demanded, military helicopters made low-level passes over peaceful protesters — a military tactic sometimes used to disperse enemy combatants — scattering debris and broken glass among the crowd.

He also had a force, including members of the National Guard and federal officers, that used flash-bang grenades, pepper spray and, according to eyewitness accounts, rubber bullets to drive lawful protesters, as well as members of the media and clergy, away from the historic St. John’s Episcopal Church.

All so he could hold a politically motivated photo op there with members of his team, including, inappropriately, Defense Secretary Mark T. Esper and Gen. Mark A. Milley, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

Looting and violence are unacceptable acts, and perpetrators should be arrested and duly tried under the law. But as Monday’s actions near the White House demonstrated, those committing such acts are largely on the margins of the vast majority of predominantly peaceful protests.

While several past presidents have called on our armed services to provide additional aid to law enforcement in times of national crisis — among them Ulysses S. Grant, Dwight D. Eisenhower, John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson — these presidents used the military to protect the rights of Americans, not to violate them.

As former leaders in the Defense Department — civilians and military, Republican, Democrat and independent — we all took an oath upon assuming office “to support and defend the Constitution of the United States,” as did the president and all members of the military, a fact that Gen. Milley pointed out in a recent memorandum to members of the armed forces.

We are alarmed at how the president is betraying this oath by threatening to order members of the U.S. military to violate the rights of their fellow Americans.

President Trump has given governors a stark choice: either end the protests that continue to demand equal justice under our laws or expect that he will send active-duty military units into their states.

While the Insurrection Act gives the president the legal authority to do so, this authority has been invoked only in the most extreme conditions when state or local authorities were overwhelmed and were unable to safeguard the rule of law. Historically, as Secretary Esper has pointed out, it has rightly been seen as a tool of last resort.

Beyond being unnecessary, using our military to quell protests across the country would also be unwise. This is not the mission our armed forces signed up for: They signed up to fight our nation’s enemies and to secure — not infringe upon — the rights and freedoms of their fellow Americans.

In addition, putting our servicemen and women in the middle of politically charged domestic unrest risks undermining the apolitical nature of the military that is so essential to our democracy. It also risks diminishing Americans’ trust in our military — and thus America’s security — for years to come.

As defense leaders who share a deep commitment to the Constitution, to freedom and justice for all Americans, and to the extraordinary men and women who volunteer to serve and protect our nation, we call on the president to immediately end his plans to send active-duty military personnel into cities as agents of law enforcement or to employ them or any another military or police forces in ways that undermine the constitutional rights of Americans.

The members of our military are always ready to serve in our nation’s defense. But they must never be used to violate the rights of those they are sworn to protect.

Signed:

  • Leon E. Panetta, former defense secretary
  • Chuck Hagel, former defense secretary
  • Ashton B. Carter, former defense secretary
  • William S. Cohen, former defense secretary
  • Sasha Baker, former deputy chief of staff to the defense secretary
  • Donna Barbisch, retired major general in the U.S. Army
  • Jeremy Bash, chief of staff to the defense secretary
  • Jeffrey P. Bialos, former deputy undersecretary of defense for industrial affairs
  • Susanna V. Blume, former deputy chief of staff to the deputy defense secretary
  • Ian Brzezinski, former deputy assistant defense secretary for Europe and NATO
  • Gabe Camarillo, former assistant secretary of the Air Force
  • Kurt M. Campbell, former deputy assistant defense secretary for Asia and the Pacific
  • Michael Carpenter, former deputy assistant defense secretary for Russia, Ukraine and Eurasia
  • Rebecca Bill Chavez, former deputy assistant defense secretary for Western hemisphere affairs
  • Derek Chollet, former assistant defense secretary for international security affairs
  • Dan Christman, retired lieutenant general in the U.S. Army and former assistant to the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff
  • James Clapper, former undersecretary of defense for intelligence and director of national intelligence
  • Eliot A. Cohen, former member of planning staff for the defense department and former member of the Defense Policy Board
  • Erin Conaton, former undersecretary of defense for personnel and readiness
  • John Conger, former principal deputy undersecretary of defense
  • Peter S. Cooke, retired major general of the U.S. Army Reserve
  • Richard Danzig, former secretary of the U.S. Navy
  • Janine Davidson, former undersecretary of the U.S. Navy
  • Robert L. Deitz, former general counsel at the National Security Agency
  • Abraham M. Denmark, former deputy assistant defense secretary for East Asia
  • Michael B. Donley, former secretary of the U.S. Air Force
  • John W. Douglass, retired brigadier general in the U.S. Air Force and former assistant secretary of the U.S. Navy
  • Raymond F. DuBois, former acting undersecretary of the U.S. Army
  • Eric Edelman, former undersecretary of defense for policy
  • Eric Fanning, former secretary of the U.S. Army
  • Evelyn N. Farkas, former deputy assistant defense secretary for Russia, Ukraine and Eurasia
  • Michèle A. Flournoy, former undersecretary of defense for policy
  • Nelson M. Ford, former undersecretary of the U.S. Army
  • Alice Friend, former principal director for African affairs in the office of the under defense secretary for policy
  • John A. Gans Jr., former speechwriter for the defense secretary
  • André Gudger, former deputy assistant defense secretary for manufacturing and industrial base policy
  • Robert Hale, former undersecretary of defense and Defense Department comptroller
  • Michael V. Hayden, retired general in the U.S. Air Force and former director of the National Security Agency and CIA
  • Mark Hertling, a retired lieutenant general in the U.S. Army and former commanding general of U.S. Army Europe
  • Kathleen H. Hicks, former principal deputy undersecretary of defense for policy
  • Deborah Lee James, former secretary of the U.S. Air Force
  • John P. Jumper, a retired general of the U.S. Air Force and former chief of staff of the Air Force
  • Colin H. Kahl, former deputy assistant defense secretary for Middle East policy
  • Mara E. Karlin, former deputy assistant defense secretary for strategy and force development
  • Frank Kendall, former undersecretary of defense for acquisition, technology and logistics
  • Susan Koch, former deputy assistant defense secretary for threat-reduction policy
  • Ken Krieg, former undersecretary of defense for acquisition, technology and logistics
  • William Leonard, former deputy assistant defense secretary for security and information operations
  • Steven J. Lepper, retired major general of the U.S. Air Force
  • George Little, former Pentagon press secretary
  • William J. Lynn III, the former deputy defense secretary
  • Ray Mabus, former secretary of the U.S. Navy and former governor of Mississippi
  • Kelly Magsamen, former principal deputy assistant defense secretary for Asian and Pacific security affairs
  • Carlos E. Martinez, retired brigadier general of the U.S. Air Force Reserve
  • Michael McCord, former undersecretary of defense and Defense Department comptroller
  • Chris Mellon, former deputy assistant defense secretary for intelligence
  • James N. Miller, former undersecretary of defense for policy
  • Edward T. Morehouse Jr., former principal deputy assistant defense secretary, and former acting assistant defense secretary for operational energy plans and programs
  • Jamie Morin, former director of cost assessment and program evaluation at the Defense Department and former acting undersecretary of the U.S. Air Force
  • Jennifer M. O’Connor, former general counsel of the Defense Department
  • Sean O’Keefe, former secretary of the U.S. Navy
  • Dave Oliver, former principal deputy undersecretary of defense for acquisition, technology and logistics
  • Robert B. Pirie, former undersecretary of the U.S. Navy
  • John Plumb, former acting deputy assistant defense secretary for space policy
  • Eric Rosenbach, former assistant defense secretary for homeland defense and global security
  • Deborah Rosenblum, former acting deputy assistant defense secretary for counternarcotics
  • Todd Rosenblum, acting assistant defense secretary for homeland defense and Americas’ security affairs
  • Tommy Ross, former deputy assistant defense secretary for security cooperation
  • Henry J. Schweiter, former deputy assistant defense secretary
  • David B. Shear, former assistant defense secretary for Asian and Pacific security affairs
  • Amy E. Searight, former deputy assistant defense secretary for South and Southeast Asia
  • Vikram J. Singh, former deputy assistant defense secretary for South and Southeast Asia
  • Julianne Smith, former deputy national security adviser to the vice president and former principal director for Europe and NATO policy
  • Paula Thornhill, retired brigadier general of the Air Force and former principal director for Near Eastern and South Asian affairs
  • Jim Townsend, former deputy assistant defense secretary for Europe and NATO policy
  • Sandy Vershbow, former assistant defense secretary for international security affairs
  • Michael Vickers, former undersecretary of defense for intelligence
  • Celeste Wallander, former deputy assistant defense secretary for Russia, Ukraine, and Eurasia
  • Andrew Weber, former assistant defense secretary for nuclear, chemical and biological defense programs
  • William F. Wechsler, former deputy assistant defense secretary for special operations and combating terrorism
  • Doug Wilson, former assistant defense secretary for public affairs
  • Anne A. Witkowsky, former deputy assistant defense secretary for stability and humanitarian affairs
  • Douglas Wise, former deputy director of the Defense Intelligence Agency
  • Daniel P. Woodward, retired brigadier general of the U.S. Air Force
  • Margaret H. Woodward, retired major general of the U.S. Air Force
  • Carl Woog, former deputy assistant to the defense secretary for communications
  • Robert O. Work, the former deputy defense secretary
  • Dov S. Zakheim, former undersecretary of defense and Defense Department comptroller

Related Sources:  Attorney Richard V. Stevens, Military Advocate

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Jim W. Dean is Managing Editor of Veterans Today involved in operations, development, and writing, plus an active schedule of TV and radio interviews. Read Full Complete Bio >>>

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4 COMMENTS

  1. I have a Trump loss at a certainty at this moment. He won with 25 % (eligible) and is half that now, of eligible voters. He is a catalyst. What the catalyst is going to lead to, is now the question.
    There is more than a few names on that list, that led us to exactly where we are.
    We need them to stay out of it. But, we all know how it is with people letting go of their glory days. If we listen to them, the reset will be softened to accommodate the old ideas. This is the greatest danger we face. That and foreign influence. This is our struggle and we need some alone time with our electorate. Don’t answer the phone.

  2. Thank GOD for these people and for you Jim Dean. And Veterans Today.

    My worry is the massive number of Americans who continue to support Trump, a broken and dangerous man. Do we have a broken and dangerous population? I believe it has to do with a badly damaged biofield when empathy, integrity and love are no longer possible.

    They will be injecting an operating system into the human race. Regular downloads. No more humanity.

    THIS IS WHAT DONALD TRUMP REPRESENTS.

    Do not consent. Do not take the jab. Protect your biofield and hold onto your Heart.

  3. Wow, there are a lot of high-order retired signers.Yes, this is certainly good,but do you know those commanders of illegal units who serve Trump?
    Do you know the structure of these divisions and who finances them?
    If you have a plan to neutralize them?
    you don’t have much time until November.

    • These people are coming forward now so others can rally around them. We have a hugely important election coming forward, that will have a major effect on the lives of all of us. As General Mattis has stated, Trump seems to have sought to divide America and been concerned mainly for his base. Everyone else is the enemy. Why he feels he can win re-election with this attitude is strange, unless he is betting that his Deep State rich friends will rig it for him, maybe because he thinks they did that for the first time.

Comments are closed.