COVID-19 Lab-Made Antibodies Could Serve As Protection Until A Vaccine

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Cryo-EM reconstructions show how two different antibodies (blue) bind in different ways to the spike protein of the SARS-CoV-2 virus. David Ho / Columbia University Irving Medical Center.

Potent neutralizing antibodies target new regions of coronavirus spike

NIH Research Matters

Scientists are racing to develop approaches to protect against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Several vaccine candidates are now in clinical trials. Another possible approach involves antibodies, proteins made by the immune system to fight infection. Antibodies work to neutralize viruses by binding to their surface and blocking entry into a person’s cells.

Antibodies that neutralize SARS-CoV-2 could be produced in a lab and given to people to treat infection. These lab-made antibodies, called monoclonal antibodies, could also serve as a prevention option until a vaccine is available. Vaccines prompt the immune system to make antibodies against a virus. Monoclonal antibodies are delivered directly to the body, through injection or intravenous infusions, and circulate in the blood.

Monoclonal antibodies are currently used to treat a variety of conditions, including rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn’s disease, and cancer. They may be the only option for older adults and others who can’t develop or maintain an adequate immune response after vaccination. But researchers must first identify powerful antibodies to neutralize SARS-CoV-2.

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Biography
Carol graduated from Riverside White Cross School of Nursing in Columbus, Ohio and received her diploma as a registered nurse. She attended Bowling Green State University where she received a Bachelor of Arts Degree in History and Literature. She attended the University of Toledo, College of Nursing, and received a Master’s of Nursing Science Degree as an Educator.

She has traveled extensively, is a photographer, and writes on medical issues. Carol has three children RJ, Katherine, and Stephen – one daughter-in-law; Katie – two granddaughters; Isabella Marianna and Zoe Olivia – and one grandson, Alexander Paul. She also shares her life with husband Gordon Duff, many cats, and two rescue pups.

Carol’s Archives 2009-2013
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4 COMMENTS

  1. Why The Fuck Are We Not Testing All Hospital Workers EVERY DAY ? We are potentially the supper-spreaders. I interact with Covfef-19 patients every day.

    • Daughters best friend tested positive today…Univ of Toledo Hospital. Thus far younger workers have gotten ill, some very ill but none have died. Lots of patients, however, have not been so lucky.

    • SouthThunder230, Hospital workers are not being tested every day (perhaps to conserve testing for others with viral symptoms)….only if they have symptoms….then if they are positive they are told to self isolate….only if they are having trouble breathing do they get a chest x-ray and then symptoms are treated…..think about this…..you have been working for months with people that you “know” have COVID-19, some made it some did not….you have seen every little horrible thing COVID-19 can do the human body, In the beginning health care workers were dealing with a very unknown virus, one that you were uncertain of how it would act, one that would prove to be highly contagious, uncertain how long the virus or someone testing positive would be infective, how sick it can make people, how it will alter clotting times, how it will cause clots that will shut down organ systems, how it will resist antivirals, although remdesivir (it was realized by using it in emergency situations) does cut the hospitalized time or time on ventilator by about 4 days…how it can make someone sick and that someone may not have made long-lasting antibodies against contracting it again, I could go on and on and on with this. While healthcare worker is in self isolation, obviously he or she cannot go to work, thus everyone that is healthy, that is left at work, takes up the slack which only makes them more tired, stressed, and we all know how unhealthy stress is for the body.

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