N.Y. Orthodox Jewish Protesters Protest for ‘Right’ to Contract Coronavirus

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Mask Burning Over Cuomo’s Crackdown on Size of Religious Gatherings

Health Editor’s Note: Cuomo ordered return to lockdown in nine New York City neighborhoods due to localized spikes in COVID-19 cases. Yes, lockdowns in only the neighborhoods which had increases in COVID-19 cases.  An additional 12 zones were placed under slightly less restrictions.

The lockdown does not mean you are locked into your house and can never leave. Restaurants will still have carry out food, only nonessential businesses will be closed, gatherings at churches should only be of ten people, banning of mass gatherings (closing of schools)…I repeat, none of these measures mean you will have to be locked in your home and are only meant to keep you from being in crowded situations where the coronavirus is easily spread from human to human. This makes total sense if one does not want to contract coronavirus.

A large Jewish population lives within the nine neigborhoods that were placed under lockdown. There is a reason for the increased cases which would be occurring due to lack of physical distancing, large gatherings, lack of mask wearing, etc. 

Always, always there is some way to try to place a clearly medical situation into the realm of politics and assaults on civil rights.  Heshy Tischler who lives in the lockdown area announced there would be “peaceful protests’ every day, but then called those protesters his soldiers and pronounced they were at war.   A war against a process that is trying to stop the spread of coronavirus and potentially save lives?  How can you declare war when someone is trying to save you?…..Carol 

Biography
Carol graduated from Riverside White Cross School of Nursing in Columbus, Ohio and received her diploma as a registered nurse. She attended Bowling Green State University where she received a Bachelor of Arts Degree in History and Literature. She attended the University of Toledo, College of Nursing, and received a Master’s of Nursing Science Degree as an Educator.

She has traveled extensively, is a photographer, and writes on medical issues. Carol has three children RJ, Katherine, and Stephen – one daughter-in-law; Katie – two granddaughters; Isabella Marianna and Zoe Olivia – and one grandson, Alexander Paul. She also shares her life with husband Gordon Duff, many cats, and two rescue pups.

Carol’s Archives 2009-2013
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7 COMMENTS

  1. Legally and philosophically, it’s an interesting concept; arguing that you are being prevented from acquiring immunity. Scientifically, it does not have to make sense, because from that perspective, science isn’t the arbiter. Ultimately, (and I know I’ve used a lot of adverbs) they are arguing against coercion.

    • The religious argument, is that the powers of the state and the will of the people do not usurp their individual right to gather, even if deemed a public health danger.
      They argue that religious freedom trumps power of the government, and in fact presides over it. thus, the end goal is to insert religious based laws in the laws of the government under the guise of religious freedom. All religions attempt this in all countries, and are very useful to outside interests.

  2. This is kind of a big deal here in NY, and the original super spreader event was a jewish wedding in New Rochelle. And again, we are talking about religions that advocate for extreme controls within their communities. Just a few rules from the Kiryas Tosh, community…
    No book, newspaper, or magazine is permitted in the buildings of the community, unless their content is in conformity to strictly Orthodox Judaism.
    All male members of the community must attend religious services, three times per day, at the synagogue.
    No radio, television, record, or cassette is allowed in the buildings of the community.
    No members of the community may attend the cinema or be present at any theatrical performance, under the penalty of immediate expulsion.

    • All women residing in the community must dress in accordance with the religious laws of modesty, as follows:
      All dresses must be at least four inches below the knees; no trousers or panty-hose may be worn by women and girls 3 years of age or older.
      Married women’s hair must be completely covered in public, by a scarf, a snood, or a wig.
      It is forbidden for unrelated men and women to walk together in the street.
      Men and women must be separated by a wall (at least 7 feet high), when attending any gathering of a religious or social nature.
      All food consumed in the buildings of the community must conform to the dietary laws of the Code of Laws, and be approved by the chief rabbi or his second in command.

    • No car may be driven by an unmarried man.
      The members must submit any inter-personal conflict to the arbitration of a rabbinical court.
      The Sabbath must be observed in strict conformity to Jewish law.
      Male members of the community must study the Torah and other religious texts for at least two hours a day. (apparently this is in addition to the 3 services per day)