…by Jonas E. Alexis, VT Editor

In the summer of 2012, Israeli writer Tom Segev published an article entitled “The Jews who fought with Mao.” He of course named some names:

“Not many Jews fought on Mao’s side, but Ianto Kaneti wasn’t the only one – there was also the Viennese-born urologist Jakob Rosenfeld, whose aid to Mao earned him the rank of general and a job as health minister in the Manchurian government.

“From 1950 until his death two years later, Rosenfeld lived in Tel Aviv and worked at Assouta Medical Center; China honored him by putting his picture on a stamp.

“Ianto Kaneti and his wife returned to Bulgaria after World War II. They settled in Pleven, and Kaneti got in touch with his Jewish relatives, the Uziel family. Relations between them were cordial; in 1950 Kaneti helped the Uziels immigrate to Israel.

“Both members of the Kaneti couple easily found their places in the Bulgarian communist establishment: Zhang Sunfen worked as a translator at the Chinese Embassy and launched a Chinese school in Sofia. Ianto died in 2004 at 94.

“The Associated Press cited a Chinese newspaper story on the death of “the last Western volunteer who fought with Mao.” A Chinese television channel produced a film about his life.”[1]

The Jewish Journal said pretty much the same thing in an article entitled, “Mao’s Jews.”[2] It added that Sidney Rittenberg “had reached the pinnacle of his revolutionary career” on October 1, 1967, when Rittenberg “seated on a reviewing stand less than fifty feet from Mao Zedong, overlooking a sea of thousands who had crowded into Tiananmen Square to mark the occasion.”[3] Rittenberg, like Jakob Rosenfeld, managed to work” his way into “Mao’s inner circle” as a “revolutionary leader.”[4]

Others like Israel Epstein from Poland, “a journalist who served as the Chinese government’s head of international public relations,” and “London-born David Crook, dean of the Beijing Foreign Languages University,” were highly revered among Mao’s powerful and secret circle of what one ought to call assassins. Why?

Because Mao, according to Frank Dikotter of the University of Hong Kong, ended up liquidating at least 45 million people within less than 10 years.[5] When Mao for example followed the Bolshevik philosophy, Dikotter tells us that “between 1958 and 1962, China descended into hell.”[6] In 1949, Mao went to Russia in order to learn from the Soviet Union, and from 1955-1956, he started to implement Stalin’s collectivization.[7]

Starvation was so rampant in China that a number of people began to eat human flesh.[8] In the summer of 1958, the famine was so horrible that “some people eventually dug up, boiled and ate human bodies. Soon the practice appeared in every region decimated by starvation, even in a relatively prosperous province such as Guangdong.”[9]

There were also instances where “several children were eaten.” Other terrible acts of cannibalism were widespread in places such as Tongwei, Yumen, Wushan, Jingning, and Wudu, and the communist leaders knew that these acts were taking place.[10]

In one place, for example, “a seventy-year-old woman unearthed the bodies of two small children and cooked them for herself.”[11] Other inhumane acts were widespread, such as tying a ten-year old and throwing him into a bog where he died after a few days.[12] Other people were left in the cold, naked, where many of them died—and even pregnant women were no exception.[13]

In other instances, excrement and urine were used as a punishment to cover people. One individual was forced to swallow excrement, and died a few weeks later.[14] Other punishment such as nailing people’s ears to the wall was also common.[15] Another extreme form of torture was burying people alive.[16]

As a result, in order to escape torture, many ended up taking their own lives.[17] For instance, “In Shantou a woman accused of theft tied her two children to her body before jumping into the river.”[18] So, Mao’s Great Leap Forward was a complete disaster for the average Chinese. And it was supported by the progenitors of the Bolshevik Revolution, which unsurprisingly was responsible for the deaths of at least 100 million people.[19]


  • [1] Tom Segev, “The Jews Who Fought With Mao,” Haaretz, July 27, 2012.
  • [2] Paul Ross, “Mao’s Jews,” Jewish Journal, November 20, 2015.
  • [3] Ibid.
  • [4] Ibid.
  • [5] Frank Dikötter, Mao’s Great Famine: The History of China’s Most Devastating Catastrophe, 1958-1962 (London: Bloomsbury Publishing, 2010); for similar studies, see Judith Shapiro, Mao’s War against Nature: Politics and the Environment in Revolutionary China (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001).
  • [6]  Dikotter, Mao’s Great Famine, ix.
  • [7] Ibid., xvii.
  • [8] Ibid., 320.
  • [9]  Ibid.
  • [10] Ibid., 321-323.
  • [11] Ibid., 323.
  • [12] Ibid., 294.
  • [13] Ibid., 294-295.
  • [14] Ibid., 295.
  • [15] Ibid., 295-296.
  • [16] Ibid., 296.
  • [17] Ibid., 304-305.
  • [18] Ibid., 305.
  • [19] See for example Jean-Louis Panné, et al., The Black Book of Communism: Crimes, Terror, Repression (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1999); for related studies, see Robert Conquest, The Harvest of Sorrow: Soviet Collectivization and the Terror-Famine (New York: Oxford University Press, 1987); The Great Terror: A Reassessment (New York: Oxford University Press, 1990 and 2008); Sheila Fitzpatrick, Everyday Stalinism: Ordinary Life in Extraordinary Times: Soviet Russia in the 1930s (New York: Oxford University Press, 1999); Orlando Figes, A People’s Tragedy: The Russian Revolution: 1891-1924 (New York: Penguin, 1998); Steven Rosefielde, Red Holocaust (New York: Routledge, 2010).

Biography
Jonas E. Alexis has degrees in mathematics and philosophy. He studied education at the graduate level. His main interests include U.S. foreign policy, history of Israel/Palestine conflict, and the history of ideas. He is the author of the new book Zionism vs. the West: How Talmudic Ideology is Undermining Western Culture. He is currently working on a book tentatively titled, Kevin MacDonald’s Abject Failure: A Philosophical and Moral Critique of Evolutionary Psychology, Sociobiology, and White Identity. He teaches mathematics in South Korea.
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11 COMMENTS

  1. Bright side: As Escobar’s “Will Confucius marry Marx” points out, the self-centered, subjectively moral spiritual foundations like those of Karl Marx (atheist “man… move around himself as his own true Sun”), and the Stalinists are subsiding in China.

    Confucianism has a collective-centered, objectively moral spiritual foundation where, as Escobar says, “moral quality and ability to govern well and fairly” are what matters, and this is making a comeback. It meshes with Christianity’s principle of “Masters, give unto your servants that which is just and equal,” so it makes sense that China is an ally of Ex-Bolshevik, Christian Russia.

    Great article, Jonas. Here’s hoping more of us can make similar improvements.

  2. “And the locust sang –far off in the distance/ And the locust sang — such a sweet melody” : Is this not what mainland China has had to be the mainguard of resistance against for several of the latest years –US trilals of bacteriological and insect warfare?

  3. However, Máo Ze´dōng (Mao Tsetung) stoppped eating meat for four years in atonement fiór his sins (as reported by his personal doctor later on in an otherwise falsee and contemptible account published when he had left China for the US of North Amer-Indianaka and resettled there,

  4. Marxist Bolshevik-Communism, what I call, ‘The Jewish Plague’, that disease of theirs, that they spread from St. Petersburg, Russia, to Shanghai, China, to Cape Town, S. Africa, all around the World, resulted in the deaths of close to 200 million Human beings, in the 20th century! MAO, the Greatest murderer of ALL TIMES, in Human History, His, ‘Great Leap Forward’ and the ‘Cultural Revolution’, produced some 60 million ‘Sacrificial Lambs’! But who is counting? They were just Yellow GOYIMS! Read; ” MAO, The Unknown Story” by, JUNG CHANG and JON HALLIDAY. Today the Murderous Monster MAO, has been elevated to that of ‘DEITY’ in RED CHINA! SAD! Makes one question of the SANITY of the Human Race!

  5. Dèng Xiǎopíng probably thought he might distance China from British Jewish influence through more closely approaching the US of North A. Little did he discern the power of the makers of World historry until before the Tiān’ānmén-square disturbances. But thense grew more discerning in his advanced years! Hope Xí Jìnping will do likewise now that their shopping trip for Israëli ports has been cut short (Eilat and Haifa harbours — Beirut too).

  6. The phocii in this otherwise commendable article on “Máo Zé’dōng-supporting Jews i mostly on those who returned to Palestine and (Eastern) Europe. Why and how come they did? Those who remained and stayed faithful communists in China were for certain never “Zionists” amongst those that i knew of there. — But possibly (well-meaning) internationalists (à la Soros Gjiórgy of Hungary Jew extraction). Well, they lamented granting Chinese-speaking muslims an autonomous province (Níngxià) and also autonomous counties (like the one separating Bêijing from Tiānjīn), but those I knew were vividly against celebrating the ancient Jewish settlements in Central North China and lamented that those remaining families were allowed to resettle in Israël — and thence into the “West bank” as new non-paying residents on Paalesinian Arab properties.

  7. One of the first to notice Máo and support him in the Comintern was not Stalin, but Trotsky. He had read Máo’s “Report on the Peasant Movement in Hunan” shortly after Máo had written it. And called for paying great attention to its thesis that peasant rebellions might become the instrument for communist struggles against imperialism and oppression in colonies and semi-colonial societies.
    There is (at least) one great difference between the top leaderships’ reaction to rural starvation between Russia and China: During the “Holomor” in The Ukraine and other-where in Russia, The Soviet authorities continued to export grain to Europe. And the leaders in Moscow did not travel to investigate. In China, Máo, Lín Biāo and Péng Dé’huai all went down to Hénán, Húbĕi and Húnán personally to inquire the lay of the Land, they strived to import cereals from abroad, which only Charles de Gaul of France was willing to supply –and then only against gold (which explains the looting af gold from Tibetan monasteries!). Later also Canada supplied wheat. Dikötter has the galll to imply that the starving Chinese finally received US cereals. No wonder he was rewarded with a professorship in Hòng Kóng for his book!

  8. It is not to be denied that those famine years in China were for the greater part man-made and with the Chinese Communist Party leadership under Máo Zé’dōng having to bear the brunt of responsibility. I travelled through Central China for some months twenty years ago and then heard of many local cadres who committed suicide afterwards when they understood their own culpability.
    The story of connections between international Jewry and Máo’s policies is a very interesting theme and exquisitely deserving of its research-abilities!

  9. Frank Dikötter of the University of Hong Kong has a very interesting methodology for calculating the number of starvation deaths during the three-year famine that followed collectivization of agriculture in Mainland China: He just adds up the highest estimates. Experts on population statistics I have asked to read his book were all aghast by this sloppy methodology of his. He “bought” his advancement from an obscure teaching post in The Low Countries to a posh professorship at the English-language University of Hong Kong with this “science”,
    That much said, it is not to be denied that those famine years in China were for the greater part man-made and with the Chinese Communist Party leadership under Máo Zé’dōng having to bear the brunt of responsibility. I travelled through Central China for some months twenty years ago and then heard of many local cadres who committed suicide afterwards when they understood their own culpability.
    The story of connections between international Jewry and Máo’s policies is a very interesting theme and exquisitely deserving of its research-abilities!