School wanted shooter to leave campus before to shooting; parents refused

Oakland County Prosecutor Karen McDonald revealed new information about the case Friday, including the disturbing notes found the morning of the shooting

5
906
Tiny Trumper...accused murderer of 4 Michigan teens

OAKLAND COUNTY, Mich. — A press conference held by Oakland County Prosecutor Karen McDonald Friday revealed new details about the fatal shooting at Oxford High School.

The shooting happened Tuesday afternoon, leaving four people dead and seven others wounded, including a teacher. Law enforcement responding to the shooting apprehended the suspect within three minutes of their arrival, taking him into custody without incident.

The school was placed on lockdown after the attack, with some children sheltering in locked classrooms while officers searched the premises. They were later taken to a nearby Meijer grocery store to be picked up by their parents.

RELATED: Authorities: Student kills 4, wounds 7 with father’s gun at east Michigan high school

The victims who died have been identified as Tate Myre, 16; Hana St. Juliana, 14; Madisyn Baldwin, 17; and Justin Shilling, 17.

In the conference, McDonald announced that the parents of 15-year-old gunman Ethan Crumbley have each been charged with four counts of involuntary manslaughter.

While charges against parents in school shooting cases are rare, McDonald said the facts in this case are “so egregious” that the charges were warranted.

“There was absolute reason to believe that this individual was dangerous and disturbed,” she said.

RELATED: Parents of Oxford shooting suspect charged with involuntary manslaughter

McDonald said that the suspect’s father, James, purchased the gun used in the shooting on Nov. 26, just four days before the shooting. It was confirmed that Ethan had accompanied James, but James had said the gun was going to be his own.

Shortly after the gun was purchased, McDonald said photos of the weapon were posted to Ethan’s social media with the caption, “Just got my new beauty today.” His mother, Jennifer, also posted to her social media, referring to the gun as Ethan’s “new Christmas present.”

On Nov. 29, the day before the shooting, one of Ethan’s teachers reported that he was seen searching for ammunition during class. While the school reached out to his parents, there was no response to discuss the behavior.

McDonald said that Jennifer had messaged Ethan, saying that she wasn’t mad at him for looking at ammunition during class, but that he had to “learn not to get caught.”

On the morning of the shooting, a teacher reported that a note was found on Ethan’s desk with disturbing drawings. McDonald said that the note featured a semiautomatic handgun pointed at the words, “The thoughts won’t stop, help me.”

The note also had a drawing of a bullet with the phrase “Blood everywhere” written above it, as well as a drawing of a person appearing to have been shot and bleeding.

The note also included the phrases, “My life is useless” and “The world is dead.”

After the note was reported, Ethan and his parents were called to the school’s office to discuss it. By the time the meeting happened, McDonald said the note had been altered.

At the meeting, a school counselor advised James and Jennifer to enroll Ethan in counseling within 48 hours. McDonald says the parents failed to ask Ethan where the gun was and did not inspect his backpack for the weapon.

When they were encouraged to remove Ethan from school that day, McDonald says James and Jennifer resisted, and Ethan was sent back to his class.

Authorities say the shooting occurred later that day just before 1 p.m.

McDonald says that when Jennifer heard about an active shooter at the school, she sent a text to Ethan at 1:22 p.m. reading, “Ethan, don’t do it.”

When James heard about an active shooter at the school, he called 911 at 1:37 p.m. to report that his gun was missing from his house and that his son may be the shooter.

ATTENTION READERS
Due to the nature of independent content, VT cannot guarantee content validity.
We ask you to Read Our Content Policy so a clear comprehension of VT's independent non-censored media is understood and given its proper place in the world of news, opinion and media.

All content is owned by author exclusively. Expressed opinions are NOT necessarily the views of VT, other authors, affiliates, advertisers, sponsors, partners or technicians. Some content may be satirical in nature. All images within are full responsibility of author and NOT VT.

About VT - Read Full Policy Notice - Comment Policy

5 COMMENTS

  1. Brilliant! (Not sarcasm. Criminal masterminds. Using children.)

    “The thoughts won’t stop, help me”.

    👆 That will get him off: premeditated insanity/mental health defense. Plus, he’s a minor.

    The Defense will try to blame the principal, for not heeding warning the teacher caught.

    TommyA beware!
    Yet another responsibility put on teachers…

    Now with criminal liability!⚠️

  2. WTF would anone expect when a jury equits Wisconsin killer kid afterm his rampage. The kid & family probably think town fathers will erect statue of this latest pysco killer. NO, IT’S NOT OK TO SHOOT PEOPLE BECAUSE YOU DONT AGREE WITH THEIR POLITICS…

  3. This is in the wake of a national report of a young girl being arrested at school by police for a drawing. Many drawings are horrific. These are reported by mandate, and I’m betting teachers and admin are sick of it and see it as a waste of their time and it is.
    Art , went the way of zombies starting in the late 90’s. There are many parallels between this incident and Artistic trends in all forms. Violence is a common theme for the artwork of our young because we are always at war, and film is always at war, and media is always at war, and now even politics are always at war. We are a Violent Culture, and our abundance means our violence is an embarrassment only, and dishonor only. Childish. Unforgivable. Shame on all of us.

    • Mihail, I’m a teacher in a largely-hispanic high school of about 1600 students. We don’t have metal detectors but there is no way a student like him gets sent back into class without security being alerted and his backpack searched. That this didn’t happen in Oxford HS is very worrisome.

Comments are closed.