Germany marks 70 years of compensating Holocaust survivors with payment for home care

“The payments to survivors and the home care program are very close to our heart,” said German Chancellor Olaf Scholz.

6
1080
Representatives from Germany and Israel meet in Luxembourg in September 1952, to sign an agreement to provide compensation for Jews who suffered under Nazi rule.

The organization that handles claims on behalf of Jews who suffered under the Nazis said Thursday that Germany had agreed to pay approximately $1.2 billion euros ($1.19 billion) for home care and compensation for Holocaust survivors living around the world in 2023.

It brought the overall amount of compensation Germany has paid to more than 80 billion euros ($79.7 billion).

The announcement came as Germany marked the 70th anniversary of the signing of the compensation agreement that made it possible for Holocaust survivors to receive a measure of justice — the so-called Luxembourg Agreements.

More than 6 million European Jews were murdered by Germany’s Nazis and their henchmen during the Third Reich.

“The extermination of European Jews by the Nazis left a horrific chasm, not only in global Jewry, but in global humanity,” said Gideon Taylor, the president of the New York-based Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany, also referred to as the Claims Conference.

“These agreements laid the groundwork for compensation and restitution for those survivors who had lost everything and continue to serve as the foundation for the ongoing negotiations on behalf of the estimated 280,00 Holocaust survivors living around the world,” Taylor added.

Auschwitz-Birkenau
The arrival of Hungarian Jews in Auschwitz-Birkenau, in German-occupied Poland, in June 1944. Galerie Bilderwelt

On Thursday, the German government invited hundreds of guests — including Holocaust survivors and members of the Claims Conference — to a ceremony at Berlin’s Jewish Museum to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the agreement and underline the special responsibility the country bears for the past, the present, and for the future.

“The Luxembourg Agreements were fundamental and led to financial compensation in the amount of more than 80 billion euros Germany has paid by the end of 2021,” said German Chancellor Olaf Scholz, who also attended the ceremony.

“The payments to survivors and the home care program are very close to our heart,” the chancellor added.

The Luxembourg Agreements concluded in 1952, created the basis for all subsequent compensations for Nazi persecution.

The negotiations were very contentious at the time and even led to violent protests in Israel, where some argued that accepting reparation payments — which they called blood money — was the equivalent of forgiving the Nazis for their crimes.

Still, it was the first time in history that a defeated power paid compensation to civilians for losses and suffering.

“As visionary as those original negotiators were, they could not have possibly imagined the long-term and deep consequences of the Holocaust on survivors,” Greg Schneider, executive vice president of the Claims Conference, told The Associated Press.

“No one possibly imagined that 70 years later there would still be elderly Holocaust survivors who were so impoverished, who were so needy, who were still suffering the dire consequences,” he said adding that that was the reason why the results of this year’s negotiation include an increase in home care of 130 million euros.

Among other payments, 12 million euros ($11.96 million) emergency humanitarian payments will be given to 8,500 Ukrainian Holocaust survivors, and 170 million euros ($166 million) will go to a special hardship fund that will impact approximately 143,000 Holocaust survivors worldwide.

As the number of Holocaust survivors dwindles, teaching the coming generations about the atrocities committed during the genocide of the Jewish people becomes ever more important. Therefore, Germany agreed for the first time in the negotiations to specifically fund Holocaust education — with 10 million euros for 2022, 25 million euros for 2023, 30 million euros for 2024, and 35 million euros for 2025

SOURCEMSNBC

ATTENTION READERS
Due to the nature of independent content, VT cannot guarantee content validity.
We ask you to Read Our Content Policy so a clear comprehension of VT's independent non-censored media is understood and given its proper place in the world of news, opinion and media.

All content is owned by author exclusively. Expressed opinions are NOT necessarily the views of VT, other authors, affiliates, advertisers, sponsors, partners or technicians. Some content may be satirical in nature. All images within are full responsibility of author and NOT VT.

About VT - Read Full Policy Notice - Comment Policy

6 COMMENTS

  1. The major problem in Germany is, that it is not allowed to debate the historical scientific aspects of the holocaust. It is regulated in the German proxi-constitution, the Grundgesetz, with an obviousness clause. My father, born at the end of 1935, died in 2019, payed taxes for his entire life to finance the compensation, a compensation he was never responsable for. The Germans signed after the war a paper non grata, that every german individual is not allowed to accuse allied war-criminals. My father, in the age of 8 or 9 years was hunted several times by US fighterbomber pilots over the fields of his home-village. He could see the laughing faces of these US war-criminals. But there was no way to any court-measure. And it is easy to recapitulate the US airforce units destroying the infrastructure in the Main-river-valley in Lower Frankonia, near Würzburg. The destruction of German railways in late 1944 and 1945 led to a breakdown of supplies, even vor concentration camps. The most inhabitants of KZs died in the last 3 monts of the war. This is the typical holodomor-policy established by the Brits in 300 hundred years with more than 80 mio. victims, used by the US in WWII. But you guys are far away from paying your guilt. So there is no forgiveness for you. God shave America.

  2. In Germany, the defeat and surrender of WW II was never declared.
    The military did it but not the government which was Hitler’s. Nor did subsequent governments ever want to take that responsibility (unless this was done in time of Covid and War on Russia). As far as I know (readings) Germany is a U.S. colony and represents U.S. imperialism with the € currency to the detriment of the peoples of southern Europe.
    Those in photo are US servants after US death squads (Rockefeller) killed patriots and saved Nazis. I am not pro-Nazi, that indeed, Nazism was transplanted to the US.
    I don’t know if you have ever seen a Fassbinder film that also talks about these things

    • Yes, the German army (Wehrmacht) surrendered unconditionally to the Allies, not any politician did it. And Germany is still mentioned in the enemy state clause of the United Nations. But the legal aspects are of no relevance. The Germans are living under the cowboy-boots, licking them, of their feudal US-Herren. And the US see in Germany the main enemy target which is to destroy for once and forever, what happens at the moment by the destruction of the German economy via enforced sanctions against Russia.